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In mechanics, we worked with a limited scale of values. In electronics, however, we shall be working with both very large and very small values. The SI measurement system de nes pre xes to scale values up and down in steps. See Table 4-1 for a list of these pre x modi ers. For example, 1,000 meters is a kilometer, or 1 km. 1/1000 of a meter is a millimeter, or 1 mm.
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CHAPTER 4 Electricity
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Magnetic eld, electron motion, and force vector. SI pre xes Pre x T G M K m m n p Scale 1,000,000,000,000 1,000,000,000 1,000,000 1,000 0.001 0.000,001 0.000,000,001 0.000,000,000,001 1012 109 106 103 10 3 10 6 10 9 10 12
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Table 4-1 Name tera giga mega kilo milli micro nano pico
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Coulomb: C The Coulomb is a measurement of electrical charge. One coulomb is equal to the charge of 6.24 1018 electrons, which is a lot of electrons.
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CHAPTER 4 Electricity CURRENT: I
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Coulombs per second: I C/s The ow of charge past a point in an electrical circuit is known as current and is represented by the symbol I. The ampere or amp, symbol A, is the unit that current is measured in. One amp of current is one coulomb of charge passing by a point in one second. If you watch your circuit for one second and 6.24 1018 electrons march by, that s one amp. I ve used the word circuit twice now. Electricity is useful when it is moving from one point to another, doing work as it goes. The path that electricity takes is called a circuit. A nonelectrical de nition of circuit is that of a path going in a circle, such as a race track. Since it s not feasible to count the individual electrons owing in a circuit, we usually measure the amp by other means. The amp can be measured because of the electromagnetic elds generated by electrical current. We measure this eld and, from this, get a measurement of current. While the coulomb is a fundamental value, the measurement of the coulomb is based on the measurement of the amp. Note that, in electronics, the electrons move from the negative terminal in a battery or generator to the positive terminal. This is electron current. In many discussions of electronic circuits, the convention is to imagine that the current ows from the positive terminal to the negative, opposite of what actually happens. This conventional current is based on the history of Benjamin Franklin s observations of electricity. As more of the true details of electricity were discovered, the convention of current owing from positive to negative remained. This doesn t actually a ect anything. If the protons really were owing from the positive terminal of the battery to the negative, their e ect would be exactly what we see for the electron ow we do have. The magnetic elds are the same and the mechanical forces applied to the wire are the same. When we reverse the motion of a charged particle, all of the vector elds associated with it reverse as well. When we reverse the polarity of a charge particle, this reverses the polarity of the elds. If you reverse both the direction and the polarity, the associated elds remain unchanged. So electrons owing in one direction have the exact same e ect as protons moving in the opposite direction.
CHAPTER 4 Electricity CHARGE DIFFERENCE
Volt: V Voltage may be represented by the symbol V or E. In this book we use V exclusively. Voltage does not exist at a single point in a circuit, but is a measurement of the di erence in electric potential between two points. Remember the potential energy we discussed in 2 The potential energy of an object was de ned in relation to its height above ground level. Voltage measurements have the same need for a ground or reference point to measure from. Voltage is based on electrical charge. Say you have a battery or generator that is pumping electrons into one end of a wire. Electrons nd each other repulsive, so they try to stay as far away from each other as they can. But what if the wire doesn t connect to the other side of the battery, so the electrons in the wire have no place to escape to They crowd closer together, but they don t enjoy it. The tighter they squeeze, the more they push against each other. Like springs, they are storing energy as they are squeezed. This creates a charge imbalance, where part of the circuit has an unusual quantity of electrons. In turn, the force created by this imbalance is known as the electromotive force (EMF). Voltage is the measurement of the di erence in pressure from one point in a circuit to another. If the whole circuit is at the same pressure, the voltage will be zero even if it holds a hefty electric charge. Water provides a popular analogy for electricity. The water molecules are like the electrons, so a gallon of water is like a coulomb of electricity. Water pipes are like wires, and the ow of water stands in for electric current. Voltage is represented by water pressure. Gravity is usually used for the electric elds. The water analogy gives us illustrations like Fig. 4-3, where two tanks have di erent water levels and the pressure of water trying to ow from the left tank to the right tank is the voltage between the tanks. If the valve were opened, the current would be the ow through the valve.
Fig. 4-3.
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