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CHAPTER 5 Starting with Electronics
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Fig. 5-10.
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Fig. 5-11.
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them until the solder melts into a small, shiny blob. Be careful not to move the wires while the solder is cooling, or it can make a poor connection. Also be sure you aren t applying the solder to the soldering iron. The melted metal ows to where the heat is, and if you touch it to the hottest part, the iron, it won t ow around the wires where you want it. See Fig. 5-11.
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Soldering a wire or component to a circuit board is easier than wire-to-wire. The process is essentially the same as wire-to-wire soldering, only you insert your wire into a hole in the circuit board to start. You can bend the wire or component lead a little bit so it doesn t fall out when you turn the board over to solder it. Figure 5-12 shows the component in the circuit board with the wires poking out through the back of the board. The soldering iron is heating the wire and the pad together. Once you have soldered the wire to the pad, you will have a shiny cone that ows around the entire pad and up the wire. A blobby junction needs to be reheated, taking care to heat both the wire and the pad. If the holes in your board are not plated through, it can be di cult to get a good solder junction. You may need to put in extra solder to bridge the gap from the pad to the wire. Be careful, though, since too much solder can create a solder bridge to another pad and create a short circuit. Once soldered into place, trim the wires down to the top of the solder cone (Fig. 5-13) and turn the board over to admire your work (Fig. 5-14). I can almost never get my parts to sit at on the board, but minor aesthetic details like that don t matter. As long as the solder joint is good, the part isn t too high o the board, and you didn t create a short, it s good. If the
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Fig. 5-12.
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CHAPTER 5 Starting with Electronics
Fig. 5-13.
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Fig. 5-14.
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part is too far o the board, it could bend over and short against a neighboring part.
Desoldering
Since nobody is perfect, you may have to remove the solder from a joint. There are di erent ways to do this. One way is with desoldering braid, which is a type of stranded wire. You lay the braid over the soldered joint and heat it with the soldering iron. Once the solder ows into the braid you can remove it, the iron, and the solder from the joint.
CHAPTER 5 Starting with Electronics
You can also get di erent types of solder suckers. These can be small squeeze bulbs or spring-action devices that provide a quick inhalation. The idea is to heat up the solder so it is liquid and then suck it into the device. These actually work, and high-end soldering stations include a small vacuumpump desoldering nozzle. Either way, you may need to heat up the wire and pad again to be able to pull the wire out of its hole, since there will still be a small amount of solder gluing it together. As with all things, soldering and desoldering are skills that will get better as you practice. In fact, you may want to practice now, before you need to solder something you care about.
SUPPLIERS
To work with electronics, you need to nd a source for parts. Radio Shack has a fair selection of parts, and they should have everything that we use in this book. For many people, they are the most convenient source of parts. Fry s Electronics, when you have one in your neighborhood, is also a good source of parts. Most larger towns also have some kind of electronic supply store that supports the local electronics repair and hobbyist communities. You can nd these using your local Yellow Pages. Almost everyone has access to mail order suppliers. Table 5-1 lists a number of the more common mail order electronics suppliers. If you want to branch out into circuit board design, Table 5-2 lists a few manufacturers of prototype boards. Note that CadSoft doesn t make circuit boards, but has a freeware software package you can use to design them.
Table 5-1
Electronics suppliers http://www.allcorp.com/
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