vb.net barcode reader sdk Capacitance in Software

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CHAPTER 10 Capacitance
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sinusoidal signal we use the root mean square (RMS) amplitude instead of the raw amplitude: A VRMS p 2 Our 5 V AC signal is equivalent to a 3.5 V DC signal. If we wanted to match the power of our 5 V DC signal we would have to generate a sinusoidal signal that has 7 V peaks.
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OSCILLOSCOPE
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Measuring resistance is done with an inexpensive multimeter, like the one shown in 5. That same meter does a ne job of measuring DC voltage and AC RMS voltage. What it won t do is give a picture of the voltage levels over time. A far more expensive tool does this, the oscilloscope (Fig. 10-4). Where calculated diagrams like Figs. 10-2 and 10-3 can show us the math and the theory of the circuit, oscilloscopes show us a representation of what is actually happening. They are invaluable tools for the electronics workbench, with their only downside being their price. A basic oscilloscope like the one pictured in Fig. 10-4 costs $400 or so, with the better models starting at $1,000 and the best models costing as much as a small car.
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Fig. 10-4.
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Oscilloscope.
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Capacitance
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Diodes
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SIGNAL DIODE
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The diode manipulates a circuit s voltage. While there are a number of nuances to the diode s behavior, it has two primary e ects on circuits. First is its unusual ability to conduct electricity in only one direction. Of course, if you apply too much voltage to a diode it will, like most components, break down and stop working correctly. Note the arrow in the diode s schematic gure in Fig. 10-5. This is the direction of the forward current (illustrated in terms of conventional current), owing from the anode (A) to the cathode (C). The cathode line on the diode itself matches the line on the schematic. You can say that the diode s arrow points toward ground, or the circuit s negative terminal. For example, in the circuit in Fig. 10-6, the diode allows electricity to conduct through the resistive load. The second attribute of the diode is its forward voltage drop. The voltage leaving a diode is always less than the voltage entering the diode. It is important to point out that, in spite of this, a diode doesn t have a signi cant resistance. This voltage drop is typically less than a volt, often about a halfvolt drop. In some cases this is just an annoying side e ect. However, you can also design circuits to speci cally use this voltage drop.
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Fig. 10-5.
Diode.
Fig. 10-6. Diode circuit.
CHAPTER 10 Capacitance
There are many other subtle attributes of diodes, such as how quickly they can respond to changing voltages, how much they leak when reverse current is applied, their breakdown voltage beyond which they burn out, and others.
RECTIFIER
If you pass alternating current through a diode it does not emerge unchanged on the other side (Fig. 10-7). A recti er converts AC to DC, more or less. One diode is a half-wave recti er, since only half of the waveform makes it through the diode. The circle with the sine wave in it is a generic signal generator and is the source of our AC signal. The tap in the upper left of the circuit shows where we measure the signal voltage relative to ground. Likewise, the tap after the diode shows the e ect the diode has on the signal. The resistor is a generic load and isn t really relevant to the recti cation process. Half of our power is being blocked by the diode. If you wanted to keep the signal positive without losing half of its power, you need more diodes to make a full-wave or bridge recti er as shown in Fig. 10-8.
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