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1. What role does the human operator have in the control loop 2. What is a semi-autonomous robot Why would you need one
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CHAPTER
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Introduction
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Language is how we communicate. It includes the complexities of our words and the ways they can be combined to carry meaning. Language is one of the most complex things we learn when we are little. Communication is not just words. In human interactions, facial expressions, body posture, and the tone and inflection of your voice all carry meaning. We may talk about body language, but is it language We won t answer these philosophical questions here, but instead focus on language as it relates to computers.
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Language Computers Any of numerous systems of precisely defined symbols and rules for using them that have been devised for writing programs or representing instructions and data. Oxford English Dictionary, Online Edition
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In 13 we looked at computer programming in terms of flowcharts and the RIS flowchart-based language. Those examples used graphical
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symbols as their language. In this chapter we map these symbols to the more compact word-based computer programming languages.
Programming Concepts
The programs in 13 used graphical symbols to represent instructions to the controller, turn on the motor, wait for three seconds, read the light sensor, and so forth. These symbols were stacked together and the controller would execute one instruction and then move down to the next instruction. These programs are written in an imperative language, where the statements (the computer equivalent of sentences) are commands to the computer. The connections between these statements define the order in which the statements are performed. They define the flow of control, making this a control flow language. The fact that these programs are written with pictures and look like flowcharts makes this a visual language, but this is just a detail of presentation. Each program is ultimately reduced to a sequence of numbers. A sequence of words could just as easily represent these numbers. For example, the program in Fig. 13-7 (copied here as Fig. 16-1) could be rewritten as text.
BumperCar_1: do Initialize repeat (forever) { do Forward if Pressed(1) then { do TimedStop do BackLeft } else { if Pressed(3) then { do Timed Stop do BackRight } } } Initialize: PowerHigh 4.0 PowerLow 2.0 TimeBackup 1.0 TimeStop 0.3
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Fig. 16-1. Sample program. Forward: Power(A, C, PowerHigh) Direction(A, C, 1) On(A, C) TimedStop: Off(A, C) Beep(2) Wait(TimeStop) BackLeft: Power(A, PowerLow) Direction(A, C, 1) OnFor(A, C, TimeBackup) BackRight: Power(C, PowerLow) Direction(A, C, 1) OnFor(A, C, TimeBackup)
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The above is not any particular computer language but pseudocode, a generic simplification of computer language. This is just one of many possible ways to represent this program, and not even a particularly realistic way. In spite of my having just made this pseudocode up, it clearly represents the same meaning as Fig. 16-1. Finally, this program is block structured. The commands are organized in blocks of related statements. The statements between any two matching curly braces {. . .} are a block, as are the named sets of statements such as BackLeft:. Block-structured programs map directly onto the shape defined by their flowchart. Imperative languages follow the internal structure of the computer hardware, and they all have roughly the same types of instructions. There are instructions to change which instruction is going to be read next, instructions to put information into storage and to get it back out again, and instructions to test information from storage and perform different actions based on the result. All programs can ultimately be reduced to a universal Turing machine. The Turing machine is a sort of primordial computer, created as an intellectual excercise by Alan Turing, a British mathematician and cryptographer. He was involved in the World War II Enigma code-breaking project, as well as the birth of modern computing.
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