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Direct Power Transfer Devices
Shaft couplings that include internal and external gears, balls, pins, and nonmetallic parts to transmit torque are shown here.
Figure 3-14
Figure 3-15
Figure 3-16
Figure 3-17
Figure 3-18
Figure 3-17
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Direct Power Transfer Devices
TEN UNIVERSAL SHAFT COUPLINGS
Hooke s Joints
The commonest form of a universal coupling is a Hooke s joint. It can transmit torque efficiently up to a maximum shaft alignment angle of about 36 . At slow speeds, on hand-operated mechanisms, the permissible angle can reach 45 . The simplest arrangement for a Hooke s joint is two forked shaft-ends coupled by a cross-shaped piece. There are many variations and a few of them are included here.
Figure 3-20 The Hooke s joint can transmit heavy loads. Antifriction bearings are a refinement often used.
Figure 3-21 A pinned sphere shaft coupling replaces a crosspiece. The result is a more compact joint.
Figure 3-22 A grooved-sphere joint is a modification of a pinned sphere. Torques on fastening sleeves are bent over the sphere on the assembly. Greater sliding contact of the torques in grooves makes simple lubrication essential at high torques and alignment angles.
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Figure 3-23 A pinned-sleeve shaft-coupling is fastened to one saft that engages the forked, spherical end on the other shaft to provide a joint which also allows for axial shaft movement. In this example, however, the angle between shafts must be small. Also, the joint is only suitable for low torques.
Constant-Velocity Couplings
The disadvantages of a single Hooke s joint is that the velocity of the driven shaft varies. Its maximum velocity can be found by multiplying driving-shaft speed by the secant of the shaft angle; for minimum speed, multiply by the cosine. An example of speed variation: a driving shaft rotates at 100 rpm; the angle between the shafts is 20 . The minimum output is 100 0.9397, which equals 93.9 rpm; the maximum output is 1.0642 100, or 106.4 rpm. Thus, the difference is 12.43 rpm. When output speed is high, output torque is low, and vice versa. This is an objectionable feature in some mechanisms. However, two universal joints connected by an intermediate shaft solve this speed-torque objection. This single constant-velocity coupling is based on the principle (Figure 3-25) that the contact point of the two members must always lie on the homokinetic plane. Their rotation speed will then always be equal because the radius to the contact point of each member will always be equal. Such simple couplings are ideal for toys, instruments, and other light-duty mechanisms. For heavy duty, such as the front-wheel drives of
Figure 3-24 A constant-velocity joint is made by coupling two Hooke s joints. They must have equal input and output angles to work correctly. Also, the forks must be assembled so that they will always be in the same plane. The shaft-alignment angle can be double that for a single joint.
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military vehicles, a more complex coupling is shown diagrammatically in Figire 3-26A. It has two joints close-coupled with a sliding member between them. The exploded view (Figure 3-26B) shows these members. There are other designs for heavy-duty universal couplings; one, known as the Rzeppa, consists of a cage that keeps six balls in the homokinetic plane at all times. Another constant-velocity joint, the Bendix-Weiss, also incorporates balls.
Figure 3-25
Figure 3-26
Figure 3-27 This flexible shaft permits any shaft angle. These shafts, if long, should be supported to prevent backlash and coiling.
Figure 3-28 This pump-type coupling has the reciprocating action of sliding rods that can drive pistons in cylinders.
Figure 3-29 This light-duty coupling is ideal for many simple, low-cost mechanisms. The sliding swivel-rod must be kept well lubricated at all times.
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