vb.net barcode reader usb Six-Tracked Drivetrains in Software

Drawer DataMatrix in Software Six-Tracked Drivetrains

Six-Tracked Drivetrains
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
ECC200 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Software applications.
There is at least one track layout (Figure 5-18) incorporated on an existing telerobotic vehicle that uses six tracks. It is an extension of the Urbie design, but was actually invented before Urbie s layout. The twotracked layout is augmented by flipper tracks on both the front and back, independently tilted, but whose tracks are driven by the main track motors. This layout allows the vehicle to stand up like the one
DataMatrix Decoder In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
ECC200 Generator In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode creation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
5
Printing DataMatrix In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in ASP.NET applications.
Draw Data Matrix 2d Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in .NET applications.
Tracked Vehicle Suspensions and Drivetrains
ECC200 Generation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in .NET framework applications.
UPC-A Supplement 5 Drawer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in Software applications.
Figure 5-18 Six-tracked, double flippers
Barcode Generation In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
Drawing EAN / UCC - 13 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Software applications.
shown in Figure 5-17. The double flippers extend the length of the twotracked base unit by almost a factor of two, facilitating crossing wide crevasses and climbing stairs, yet still being able to turn in place in a small aisle.
Code 128 Code Set A Encoder In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in Software applications.
Code-39 Printer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code39 image in Software applications.
This page intentionally left blank.
Code 11 Creator In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create USD8 image in Software applications.
Draw Matrix 2D Barcode In VB.NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create 2D Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
6
Generating Linear 1D Barcode In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create 1D Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Generate Data Matrix In .NET
Using Barcode printer for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
Steering History
UPC-A Supplement 2 Printer In Java
Using Barcode generator for Android Control to generate, create GS1 - 12 image in Android applications.
Linear Generation In C#
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create 1D image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Copyright 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for Terms of Use.
Bar Code Creation In Java
Using Barcode generation for Android Control to generate, create barcode image in Android applications.
UCC.EAN - 128 Drawer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode printer for Reporting Service Control to generate, create EAN 128 image in Reporting Service applications.
This page intentionally left blank.
he Romans extensively used two wheeled carts, pulled by horses. Pull on the right rein and the horse pulls the cart to the right, and vise versa. The two wheels on the cart were mounted on the same axle, but were attached in a way that each wheel could rotate at whatever speed was needed depending on whether the cart was going straight or around a corner. Carts got bigger and eventually had four wheels, two in front and two in back. It became apparent (though it is unclear if it was the Romans who figured this out) that this caused problems when trying to turn. One or the other set of wheels would skid. The simplest method for fixing this problem was to mount the front set of wheels on each end of an axle that could swivel in the middle (Figure 6-1). A tongue was attached to the axle and stuck out from the front of the vehicle, which in turn was attached to a horse. Pulling on the tongue aligned the front wheels with the turn. The back wheels followed. This method worked well and, indeed, still does for four wheeled horse drawn buggies and carriages.
Figure 6-1 wheels
Pivot mounted front
6
Steering History
In the early 1800s, with the advent of steam engines (and, later, electric motors, gas engines, and diesel engines) this steering method began to show its problems. Vehicles were hard to control at speeds much faster than a few meters per second. The axle and tongue took up a lot of room swinging back and forth under the front of the vehicle. An attempt around this problem was to make the axle long enough so that the front wheels didn t hit the cart s sides when turning, but it was not very convenient having the front wheels wider than the rest of the vehicle. The first effective fix was to mount the two front wheels on a mechanism that allowed each wheel to swivel closer to its own center. This saved space and was easier to control and it appeared to work well. In 1816, George Lankensperger realized that when turning a corner with the wheels mounted using that geometry the inside wheel swept a different curve than the outside one, and that there needed to be some other mechanical linkage that would allow this variation in alignment. He teamed with Rudolph Ackerman, whose name is now synonymous with this type of steering geometry. Although Ackerman steering is used on almost every human controlled vehicle designed for use on roads, it is actually not well suited for high mobility vehicles controlled by computers, but it feels right to a human and works very well at higher speeds. It turns out there are many other methods for turning corners, some intuitive, some very complex and unintuitive.
STEERING BASICS
When a vehicle is going straight the wheels or tracks all point in the same direction and rotate at the same speed, but only if they are all the same diameter. Turning requires some change in this system. A twowheeled bicycle (Figure 6-2) shows the most intuitive mechanism for performing this change. Turn the front wheel to a new heading and it rolls in that direction. The back wheel simply follows. Straighten out the front wheel, and the bicycle goes straight again. Close observation of a tricycle s two rear wheels demonstrates another important fact when turning a corner: the wheel on the inside of the corner rotates slower than the outside wheel, since the inside wheel is going around a smaller circle in the same amount of time. This important detail, shown in Figure 6-3, occurs on all wheeled and tracked vehicles. If the vehicle s wheels are inline, there must be some way to allow the wheels to point in different directions. If there are wheels on either side, they must be able to rotate at different speeds. Any deviation from this
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.