vb.net barcode reader usb Figure 10-16 Simple direct drive swinging jaw in Software

Draw Data Matrix 2d barcode in Software Figure 10-16 Simple direct drive swinging jaw

Figure 10-16 Simple direct drive swinging jaw
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Figure 10-17 Simple direct drive through right angle worm drive gearmotor
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turns the other. This pulls the two jaws together. The jaws can be moved through a linear actuator or can be directly mounted on a motor gearbox s output shaft (Figure 10-16), or driven through a right angle drive (Figure 10-17) which places the drive motor further out of the way of the gripper. This and similar designs have the drawback that the jaws are always at an angle to each other which tends to push the thing being grabbed out of the jaws.
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Figure 10-18
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Rack and pinion drive gripper
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Figure 10-19
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Reciprocating lever gripper
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Figure 10-20 Linear actuator direct drive gripper
A more effective jaw layout is the parallel jaw gripper. One possible layout adds a few more links to the basic two fingers to form a four-bar linkage which holds the jaws parallel to each other easing the sometimes very difficult task of keeping the thing being grabbed in the gripper until it closes. Another way to get parallel motion is to use a linear actuator to move one or both jaws directly towards and away from each other. These layouts are shown in Figures 10-21, 10-22, and 10-23.
Figure 10-21 Parallel jaw on linear slides
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Figure 10-22 Parallel jaw using four-bar linkage
Figure 10-23 Parallel jaw using four-bar linkage and linear actuator
PASSIVE PARALLEL JAW USING CROSS TIE
Twin four-bar linkages are the key components in this long mechanism that can grip with a constant weight-to-grip force ratio any object that fits
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Figure 10-24 Passive parallel jaw using cross tie
within its grip range. The long mechanism relies on a cross-tie between the two sets of linkages to produce equal and opposite linkage movement. The vertical links have extensions with grip pads mounted at their ends, while the horizontal links are so proportioned that their pads move in an inclined straight-line path. The weight of the load being lifted, therefore, wedges the pads against the load with a force that is proportional to the object s weight and independent of its size. Some robots are designed to do one specific task, to carry one specific object, or even to latch onto some specific thing. Installing a dedicated knob or ball end on the object simplifies the gripping task using this mating one-way connector. In many cases, a joint like this can be used independently of any manipulator.
PASSIVE CAPTURE JOINT WITH THREE DEGREES OF FREEDOM
New joint allows quick connection between any two structural elements where rotation in all three axes is desired.
Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama
A new joint, proposed for use on an attachable debris shield for the International Space Station Service Module, has potential for commer-
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Figure 10-25 The threedegrees-of-freedom capability of the passive capture joint provides for quick connect and disconnect operations.
cial use in situations where hardware must be assembled and disassembled on a regular basis. This joint can be useful in a variety of applications, including replacing the joints commonly used on trailer-hitch tongues and temporary structures, such as crane booms and rigging. Other uses for this joint include assembly of structures where simple rapid deployment is essential, such as in space, undersea, and in military structures. This new joint allows for quick connection between any two structural elements where it is desirable to have rotation in all three axes. The joint can be fastened by moving the two halves into position. The joint is then connected by inserting the ball into the bore of the base. When the joint ball is fully inserted, the joint will lock with full strength. Release of this joint involves only a simple movement and rotation of one part. The joint can then be easily separated. Most passive capture devices allow only axial rotation when fastened if any movement is allowed at all. Manually- or power-actuated active joints require an additional action, or power and control signal, as well as a more complex mechanism. The design for this new joint is relatively simple. It consists of two halves, a ball mounted on a stem (such as those on a common trailerhitch ball) and a socket. The socket contains all the moving parts and is the important part of this invention. The socket also has a base, which contains a large central cylindrical bore ending in a spherical cup. This work was done by Bruce Weddendorf and Richard A. Cloyd of the Marshall Space Flight Center.
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