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//=========================================================== //--- Subroutine PlaceRobot //--- Inputs : BcnClr,LnClr,RobotSize,SlipValue,NodesCount //--- Outputs : RobotNode //--- Calls To: none //----------------------------------------------------------PlaceRobot: rLocate 558,565,0,RobotSize rInvisible LnClr rSlip SlipValue rIgnoreCharge false RobotNode = NodesCount-1 Return //=========================================================== //=========================================================== //--- Subroutine DrawOffice //--- Inputs : none //--- Outputs : none //--- Calls To: none //----------------------------------------------------------DrawOffice: ClearScr LineWidth 15 Data Walls;-165,140,165,0,-357,245,0,245,-590,513,590,600 Data Walls;-165,140,255,140,-360,140,517,140,-530,513,530,600 Data Walls;-644,140,797,140,-517,140,517,0,-474,245,699,245 Data Walls;-474,246,474,419,797,419,-357,247,357,470,113,470 MPolygon Walls Cabinet_H = "rrrddddllluuuu" Cabinet_V = "dddlllluuurrrr" Desk_H = "rrrrrrrrrrdddddlllluuuulllllddddluuuuu" Desk_V = "ddddddddddllllluuuurrrruuuuullllurrrrr" linewidth 1 //Desks & Cabinets Locations Data Furniture; "CH",478,0,"CH",597,559,"CH",769,370 Data Furniture; "CH",0,252,"CH",0,0 Data Furniture; "CV",564,0,"CV",40,569,"CV",214,569 Data Furniture; "CV",169,569,"CV",156,0 Data Furniture; "DV",348,300,"DV",800,496,"DV",800,0 Data Furniture; "DH",481,252,"DH",259,0 //Draw them for I = 0 to MaxDim(Furniture,1)-1 step 3 if Furniture[I] = "CH" then ss = Cabinet_H if Furniture[I] = "DH" then ss = Desk_H if Furniture[I] = "CV" then ss = Cabinet_V if Furniture[I] = "DV" then ss = Desk_V DrawShape ss,Furniture[I+1],Furniture[I+2],10 next //Shade them Data FF_Cabinets; 10,-17, 10,-271, 488,-21 Data FF_Cabinets;782,-395, 612,-585, 140,-19, 544,-24 Data FF_Cabinets; 22,-584, 151,-586, 198,-580 MPolygon FF_Cabinets,darkgray Data FF_Desks;337,-34, 776,-80, 323,-388, 565,-274 Data FF_Desks;772,-580 MPolygon FF_Desks,gray //Tables Circle 59,69,109,119,darkgray,darkgray Circle 118,329,168,379,darkgray,darkgray
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FIGURE 15.5
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DrawOf ce and PlaceRobot.
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//Charger Station Rectangle 558-10,554+35-10,558+10,554+35+10,blue,blue //Chairs Data Chairs;275,27,699,16,500,319,245,316,723,512,75,279 for I = 0 to MaxDim(Chairs,1)-1 step 2 X = Chairs[I] Y = Chairs[I+1] Sp = 35 //leg spacing LD = 4 //leg diameter Cl = Brown //color for legs Circle X,Y,X+LD,Y+LD,Cl,Cl Circle X+Sp,Y,X+Sp+LD,Y+LD,Cl,Cl Circle X,Y+Sp,X+LD,Y+Sp+LD,Cl,Cl Circle X+Sp,Y+Sp,X+Sp+LD,Y+Sp+LD,Cl,Cl next data labels; 34, 0,"1=Break Room", 370, 0,"2=Office 1" data labels;579, 0,"3=Office 2" , 590,253,"4=Office 3" data labels;241,253,"5=Office 4" , 652,584,"6=Office 5" data labels;224,584,"7=HallWay 1" , 50,584,"8=HallWay 2" setcolor LnClr for I=0 to MaxDim(labels,1)-1 step 3 xystring labels[I],labels[I+1],labels[I+2] next Return //===========================================================
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FIGURE 15.5
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(Continued )
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FIGURE 15.6 The of ce plan.
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The parameters LnClr, BcnClr, SlipValue, and RobotSize are set at the top of the program. They are placed there for easy changing if it becomes necessary, as you will see in the case of SlipValue in later sections. NodesCount is set by the subroutine MapOf ce (see later sections). 15.2.5 MAPPING THE OFFICE If you look at Fig. 15.6 you will see that the of ce plan is complex enough to baf e the robot if it did not have a planned route from one room to another. It would be impossible to make the robot go to a desired room if it did not have a means of knowing which room is which and how to get there. One solution is to give our robot a map of the of ce. You have seen how to do this in Chap. 14, where we used a graph to represent the interconnectivity of the various junctions in the maze. The of ce environment is really a type of maze. The only difference is that there are no lines to follow and the robot can move in any direction, not just horizontally and vertically as before. Once the map of the of ce is created (in the form of a graph see Chap. 14) the process of making the robot move around the map should be similar to what we have seen in Chap. 14. The trick is in how we create the graph. If you examine Fig. 15.7 you will see that we have drawn a network of virtual paths that guarantees the robot access to all the areas of the of ce. Notice the nodes are not
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FIGURE 15.7 A virtual highway.
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just at intersection points. Some nodes are required as intermediary positions that guarantee the robot the ability to reach the next node without having to negotiate around walls. Also, some nodes are added to minimize the distance between nodes for reasons that will become clear in later sections. In each room there is a designated spot that the robot will reach and wait for the of ce employee to interact with it. The robot will not move around the of ce to any other point. However, if you desire the robot to be able to reach more spots in a room you can design more nodes for it to be able to navigate to (see Exercises). You can now see how we can map the of ce. We give each of the nodes in Fig. 15.7 a number and then create an array showing which node is connected to which, just as we have done in Chap. 14. The robot will always move from one node to another. In the command program, simulated by the ChooseRoom subroutine, we only allow the user to specify certain nodes that happen to be within each of the rooms. There is no way in our program for the user to command the robot to go to any of the intermediate nodes but we could have done so if we wished. In this example though, there is no logical reason for the robot to stop at any of the intermediate nodes. Notice that the charging room is not on the list of destinations that the user can command. However, the charging room is a node that the robot will want to go to by itself whenever it is idle for an extended time or when the battery charge drops below a certain level. We could give each node a number, but it would be better to label them with meaningful names such as Of ce 1 or Of ce1_D (for the door) so we can modify and add nodes without having to worry about their positions in the array. This effectively creates a database of nodes. Each entry in the array of nodes (Nodes[ ]) will hold the name of the node and its x, y coordinate in the of ce (see Fig. 15.8). In a real of ce there would be a reference point and the x, y coordinate would be in reference to that point in inches or centimeters. The array Nodes[ ] is created indirectly via the array OF[ ]. We use a set of Data statements to specify the data for all the nodes. It is a lot easier to use Data statements to do this work than individually assigning the value of each array element in Nodes[ ]. We then use the command MCopy to copy the contents of OF[ ] into the previously dimensioned (to the correct dimensions) array Nodes[ ]. Remember, the Data command creates a one-dimensional array. This is convenient when entering the data but is not convenient for accessing the data later on. For this reason we create the two-dimensional array Nodes[ ] and copy the data from the single-dimensional array OF[ ] into it. The MCopy command ensures that the correct elements from OF [ ] are copied to the correct position of Nodes[ ]. So long as the data is in sets of three, MCopy will copy the rst three elements from OF[ ] into the rst row in Nodes[ ] and then the next three elements into the next row, and so on until all the NodesCount rows of Nodes[ ] are filled. Notice how the variable NodesCount is calculated. As mentioned before in Chap. 9, this is a more versatile way to do this than actually counting by hand. If we later modify the list of nodes we won t have to worry about the count. Two constraints are imposed on the array. First, all the nodes at the beginning are nodes that will be on the list of nodes that can be commanded. Second, the last two nodes are the nodes for the charging room. The reasons for the second constraint will be discussed
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