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Another popular emerging standard is the attribute certificate (AC). Although ACs are similar in structure to public-key certificates, ACs provide different functionality. ACs do not contain a public key for an individual. Instead, they are used to bind an entity to a set of attributes that specify membership, role, security clearance, or other authorization information. Attribute certificates, like public-key certificates, are digitally signed to prevent changes after the fact. In conjunction with current authentication services, ACs can provide a means to transport authorization information securely. Applications that can use this technology include those that provide remote access to network resources (such as Web servers and databases) and those that control physical access to buildings and facilities. For example, after a user signs on, his or her identity can be verified through the use of the current public-key certificate. After the user has logged in, his or her public key can be used to create a secure session with an access control server, and the user s attribute certificate can be checked against a list of valid users. Figure 6-10 illustrates a standard attribute certificate.
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ISO has defined the basic attribute certificate, and IETF is currently profiling these definitions for use in Internet environments.
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Figure 6-10 Controlling access with attribute certificates
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Version (V.1 or V.2) Holder Name (Comparable to Subject's Name) Issuer Name Signature Serial Number Validity period (Start/End Date/Time) Attributes Issuer Unique Identifier Extensions
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Certificate Policies and Certification Practice Statements
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Certification authorities act as trusted third parties, vouching for the contents of the certificates they issue. But what exactly does a CA certify What makes one CA more trusted than another Two mechanisms are used by CAs to establish trust among end users and relying parties. These are certificate policies and certification practice statements. The X.509 standard defines a certificate policy as a named set of rules that indicates the applicability of a certificate to a particular community and/or class of application with common security requirements. One or more certificate policies can be identified in the standard extensions of an X.509 Version 3 certificate. As relying parties obtain a certificate for processing, they can use the policies specified in that certificate to make a decision of trust. A more detailed description of practices is made available through the use of a certification practice statement, a concept originated by the American Bar Association (ABA). According to the ABA s Digital Signature Guidelines, a CPS is a statement of the practices which the certification
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Public-Key Infrastructures and the X.509 Standard
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authority employs in issuing certificates. A CPS gives relying parties a basis for making a trust decision concerning a CA. The relationship between certificate policies and CPSs is not entirely clear. Each kind of document was created for unique reasons by different sources. CPSs tend to provide a detailed statement about a CA s practices, whereas certificate policies tend to provide a broader definition of practices. RFC2527 outlines the key components of a CPS as follows:
Introduction This part of a CPS provides a general overview of the certificate policy definition, indicating any applicable names or other identifiers (for example, ASN.1 object identifiers) that are used in the statement. It should also provide all contact information (name, phone number, address, and so on) of the responsible authority. General Provisions This section describes the various obligations, rights, and liabilities of the CA or RA, end users, and relying parties. It also includes information about how and how often certificates and CRLs will be published. Identification and Authentication This section describes the procedures used by the CA or RA to authenticate an end user applicant. It also describes how end users should request certificate revocations and key updates. Operational Requirements This section describes the requirements for certificate enrollment, issuance, and acceptance. It also addresses suspension, revocation, and the frequency of CRLs. Various security concerns are also covered, such as audit procedures, compromise and disaster recovery, and procedures for CA termination. Physical, Procedural, and Personnel Security Controls This section defines the nontechnical controls that are in place to provide for secure key generation, subject authentication, certificate issuance, certificate revocation, audit, and archiving. Such controls, for example, might include off-site record storage and background investigations of employees who fill trusted roles. Technical Security Controls This section describes the security measures taken by a CA to protect its private keys. Examples include where and how private keys are stored and who can activate and deactivate a private key.
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