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After two communicating entities have established an IKE SA using either main or aggressive mode, they can use quick mode. Quick mode, unlike the other two modes, is used solely to negotiate general IPSec security services and to generate fresh keying material. Because the data is already inside a secure tunnel (every packet is encrypted), you can afford to be a little more flexible in quick mode. Quick mode packets are always encrypted and always start with a hash payload, which is composed using the agreed-upon pseudo-random function and the derived authentication key for the IKE SA. The hash payload is used to authenticate the rest of the packet. Quick mode defines which parts of the packet are included in the hash. As shown in Figure 7-13, the initiator sends a packet with the quick mode hash; this packet contains proposals and a nonce. The responder
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Figure 7-13 Quick mode transactions
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Network and Transport Security Protocols
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then replies with a similar packet, this time generating its own nonce and including the initiator s nonce in the quick mode hash for confirmation. The initiator then sends back a confirming quick mode hash of both nonces, completing the exchange. Finally, using the derivation key as the key for the hash, both parties perform a hash of a concatenation of the following: the nonces, the SPI, and the protocol values from the ISAKMP header that initiated the exchange. The resulting hash becomes the new password for that SA.
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Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), the Internet protocol for session-based encryption and authentication, provides a secure pipe between two parties (the client and the server). SSL provides server authentication and optional client authentication to defeat eavesdropping, tampering, and message forgery in client-server applications. By establishing a shared secret between the two parties, SSL provides privacy. SSL works at the transport layer (below the application layer) and is independent of the application protocol used. Therefore, application protocols (HTTP, FTP, TELNET, and so on) can transparently layer on top of SSL, as shown in Figure 7-14.
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Figure 7-14 SSL in the TCP/IP stack
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The History of SSL
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Netscape originally developed SSL in 1994. Since then, SSL has become widely accepted and is now deployed and supported in all major Web browsers and servers as well as various other software and hardware products (see Figure 7-15). This protocol currently comes in three versions: SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1 (also known as SSLv3.1). Although all three can be found in use around the world, SSLv3, released in 1995, is the predominant version.
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Figure 7-15
7
The padlock symbol in this browser denotes the use of SSL for Web security
Any system of the type discussed in this chapter is composed of two parts: its state and the associated state transitions. The system s state describes the system at a particular point in time. The state transitions are the processes for changing from one state to another. The combination of all possible states and state transitions for a particular object is called a state machine. SSL has two state machines: one for the client side of the protocol and another for the server side. Each endpoint must implement the matching side of the protocol. The interaction between the state machines is called the handshake. It is the responsibility of the SSL handshake protocol to coordinate the states of the client and server, thereby enabling each one s protocol state machine to operate consistently even though the state is not exactly parallel. Logically, the state is represented twice: once as the current operating state and (during the handshake protocol) a second time as the pending state. Additionally, separate read and write states are main-
Session and Connection States
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SSLv3 solved many of the deficiencies in the SSLv2 release. SSLv3 enables either party (client or server) to request a new handshake (see next section) at any time to allow the keys and ciphers to be renegotiated. Other features of SSLv3 include data compression, a generalized mechanism for Diffie-Hellman and Fortezza key exchanges and non-RSA certificates, and the ability to send certificate chains. In 1996, Netscape turned the SSL specification over to the IETF. Currently, the IETF is standardizing SSLv3 in its Transport Layer Security (TLS) working group. TLSv1 is very similar to SSLv3, with only minor protocol modifications. The first official version of TLS was released in 1999.
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