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Broadcast to resolve names. Uses a mixture of directed and broadcast UDP and TCP for resolving name. All network nodes must listen for broadcasts. Point-to-point only node. Uses directed UDP and TCP connections. Relies on access to name server to resolve names. Mixed node. Tries broadcast first and then point-to-point with name server if no response to broadcast. Hybrid node. Tries point-to-point first and then falls back to broadcast if the name server cannot be contacted. Same as an H-NODE but will also use the
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Thus far, we have taken a brief look at MS Windows network services and protocols at the network, transport, and to a limited degree, the session layer. Now we are ready to move higher in the stack and probe the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, which is where Samba lives and breathes (Figure 3.2). SMB is a session-, presentation-, and application-layer protocol that provides a means for remotely sharing files, printers, and various communication resources between networked computers. The SMB protocol was first defined in a joint Microsoft and Intel document titled Microsoft Networks/OpenNETFile Sharing Protocol in 1987. Early SMB implementations included MS LAN Manager in 1987 and OS/2 LAN Server in 1988. In 1992 SMB became an Open Group interoperability standard, "Protocols for X/Open PC Interworking: SMB, Version 2,
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X/Open CAE Specification C209." Microsoft, in collaboration with a number of computing and networking vendors, defined an enhanced version of SMB under a new title, the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol. CIFS version 1.0 has been submitted as a draft to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) for consideration as an informational RFC. SMB is a connection-oriented protocol implemented on the NetBIOS API. The protocol provides a mechanism for Windows consumer and server applications to communicate in a request/response manner over a virtual circuit. The internal structure of each server message block is represented as a string of Intel format multi-byte values ordered least significant byte first. Each block begins with a fixed-length header, followed by a variable set of parameter fields, and finishes with a data buffer. The SMB command protocol can essentially be broken down into four types of operations; session, file, printer, and message. SMB session commands are used to set up a virtual circuit and validate access. File and printer commands permit an application to operate on files and spool jobs to remote printers. Message commands provide a means for passing alert, control, and informational messages between the consumer and server applications. The simplified SMB session described in Example 3.3 will give a feel for how SMB sessions are set up and released. Example 3.3 SMB Session SMBnegprot SMBsesssetup SMBtcon SMBopen SMBread SMBclose SMBtdis Initial message listing dialects supported by the consumer application. Server responds with selected dialect. The application's credentials are passed for verification. Server responds with UID. Indicates the name of the share requested by the client. Server responds with TID of share. File name to open. Server responds with FID to be used in subsequent file operations. TID, FID, offset, and number of bytes to read. Close file FID in share TID. Disconnect from share TID.
The initial negotiation of SMB dialect in the example is required due to extensions in the protocol that have occurred over its development history. The base level SMB version is known as the "core protocol." Other dialects are listed in Table 3.3. Samba supports SMB at the CIFS 1.0 and Windows NT LAN Manager 0.12 level. Table 3.3 SMB Dialects
PC Network Program 1.0 Microsoft Networks 1.03 Microsoft Networks 3.0
Core Protocol Core plus Protocol Extended 1.0 Protocol
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One of the features of newer versions of the SMB protocol is that it supports opportunistic locking or oplocks. By acquiring an oplock on a file an SMB application can read ahead and buffer data locally for updates, thus improving performance. There are three types of oplocks. Acquisition of an Exclusive oplock means that no other application can read or modify the target file. The lock holder has exclusive control over the file. A Batch oplock allows an application to maintain a lock on the file through successive opens and closes, thus reducing network traffic between the client and server. A Level II oplock permits multiple applications to read a file but not update it.
Common Internet File System (CIFS)
As mentioned earlier, CIFS is an enhanced version of the SMB protocol. Along with being backwards-compatible with SMB, CIFS provides a means for sharing resources between multiple OS platforms across the Internet. This is accomplished through the use of HTTP URL-like resource location semantics and Internet DNS. In regard to scalability and fault tolerance, CIFS supports multiple writers to a single file through aggressive locking and caching algorithms. With its intent to support resource sharing in a larger community, CIFS can adapt to a wide range of network speeds. This includes everything from slow dial-up modem bit rates to gigabit backbone connections. Unicode character sets are also employed with the wider Internet audience in mind.
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