vb.net qr code reader SWAT in Software

Printer Code 3 of 9 in Software SWAT

SWAT
USS Code 39 Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Code 39 Extended Creation In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
For those more accustomed to the ease of use and error checking provided by a GUI configuration tool, Samba Version 2.x provides a Web-based configuration and administration tool aptly named the Samba Web Administration Tool (SWAT) (Figure 6.1). Being Web based, SWAT can be invoked from a remotely networked workstation. This is a handy capability for those administering a number of geographically disparate Samba servers or making late-night configuration changes over a dialup link from the comfort of home. SWAT provides HTML forms for the various section types represented in the smb.conf file (Figure 6.2). SWAT simplifies general configuration tasks and allows the system administrator to focus on the section definition of interest.
Code 39 Full ASCII Reader In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Code 3 Of 9 Generator In Visual C#
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create Code39 image in .NET applications.
- 77 -
Code 3/9 Maker In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 image in ASP.NET applications.
Drawing USS Code 39 In .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in .NET framework applications.
Figure 6.1: Samba SWAT administration tool
Printing USS Code 39 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
UPC-A Supplement 2 Creator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A image in Software applications.
- 78 -
Barcode Creation In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
ECC200 Encoder In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
Figure 6.2: Sample SWAT section configuration form
GTIN - 13 Printer In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
Bar Code Generator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
SWAT is installed by default in the $(BASEDIR)/swat directory as part of the general Samba build and install procedure. Before you can use SWAT, you need to add entries to /etc/services and /etc/inetd.conf identifying the port and service name to your system (Example 6.2). Don't forget to send a HUP signal to the inetd daemon after making your changes. Once SWAT has been configured into the system, you can invoke the service from your favorite Web browser by opening the following URL. SWAT will prompt you for the administrator's user name and password. Warning Be aware that SWAT will remove all comments, include=, and copy= parameters when it rewrites your smb.conf file. Make sure you keep this in mind if you are using these parameters to support multiple Samba installations from a common smb.conf template. Example 6.2 SWAT Internet Service Configuration /etc/services: swat 901/tcp /etc/inetd.conf:
Create ISSN In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create ISSN - 13 image in Software applications.
UPC A Maker In VS .NET
Using Barcode generator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create UPC A image in Reporting Service applications.
- 79 -
Scanning European Article Number 13 In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
UCC - 12 Creation In None
Using Barcode maker for Word Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Office Word applications.
swat stream tcp nowait.400 root /usr/local/samba/bin/swat swat
Making Code 128A In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPad Control to generate, create Code128 image in iPad applications.
Code 128C Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Variable and File Substitution
DataMatrix Maker In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPhone Control to generate, create ECC200 image in iPhone applications.
USS Code 128 Drawer In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in ASP.NET applications.
A powerful Samba feature that will assist in simplifying smb.conf configuration is variable substitution. Samba provides a fixed set of variables, prefixed by a "%" sign, that take on values during runtime processing. Variable substitution can be used anywhere within the smb.conf file where a string value is valid. For example, the "%m" variable is often used to associate the requesting client's NetBIOS name to a local server resource like a log file. log file = /usr/local/samba/var/%m.log Given a client NetBIOS name of WIZARD, /usr/local/samba/var/%m.log becomes /usr/local/samba/var/WIZARD.log. Some variables may only be within the context of a share section. These would include variables like the requested service name or the validated client UNIX account name. The remaining set of variables may be used in all sections. Table 6.3 lists the set of predefined variables in Samba Version 2.0.5a. Share section variables are listed at the bottom of the table. Table 6.3 smb.conf Defined Variables
%G = primary group name of %u %I = the IP address of the client machine %L = the NetBIOS name of the server. This allows you to change your config based on what the client calls you. Your server can have a dual personality. %M = the internet DNS name of the client machine %N = the name of your NIS home directory server. This is obtained from your NIS auto.map entry. If you have not compiled Samba with the automount option then this value will be the same as %L. %R = the selected protocol level after protocol negotiation. It can be one of CORE, COREPLUS, LANMAN1, LANMAN2, or NT1. %T = the current date and time %U = session user name (the user name that the client wanted, not necessarily the same as the one they got i.e. UNIX user name that was actually used). %a = the architecture of the remote machine. Only some are recognized, and those may not be 100% reliable. It currently recognizes Samba, WfWg, WinNT, and Win95. Anything else will be known as "UNKNOWN". If it gets it wrong, then sending a level 3 log to mailto:samba-bugs@ samba.org should allow it to be fixed.
- 80 -
%d = the process ID of the current server process %h = the internet DNS hostname on which Samba is running %m = the NetBIOS name of the client machine (very useful) %p = the path of the service's home directory, obtained from your NIS auto.map entry. The NIS auto.map entry is split up as "%N:%p". %v = the Samba version
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.