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smbstatus [-b] [-d] [-L] [-p] [-S] [-s configuration file] [-u username] smbstatus is a very simple program to list the current Samba connections.
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smbtar -s server [-p password] [-x service] [-X] [-d directory] [-u user] \ [-t tape] [-b blocksize] [-N filename] [-i] [-r] [-l log level] [-v] filenames smbtar is a very small shell script on top of smbclient which dumps SMB shares directly to tape. mount-point is a UNIX umount for normal users. With this program, normal users can unmount smbfilesystems, provided that it is suid root.
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swat [-s smb config file] [-a] swat allows a Samba administrator to configure the complex smb.conf file via a Web browser. In addition, a SWAT configuration page has help links to all the configurable options in the smb.conf file making it easy for an administrator to look up the effects of any change. will trace and display contents of SMB packets; it is similar to standard tcpdump utility.
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testparm [-s] [config file name] [hostname hostIP] testparm is a very simple test program to check an smbd configuration file for internal correctness. If this program reports no problems, you can use the configuration file with confidence that smbd will successfully load the configuration file.
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testprns printername [printcapname] testprns is a very simple test program to determine whether a given printer name is valid for use in a service to be provided by smbd.
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Appendix C: Samba 2.0.5a smb.conf.default
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Overview
# This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the # smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed # here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options (perhaps too # many!) most of which are not shown in this example # # Any line which starts with a ; (semi-colon) or a # (hash) # is a comment and is ignored. In this example we will use a # # for commentry and a ; for parts of the config file that you # may wish to enable # # NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command
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"testparm" # to check that you have not many any basic syntactic errors. # #====================== Global Settings ========================== [global] # workgroup = NT-Domain-Name or Workgroup-Name, eg: REDHAT4 workgroup = MYGROUP # server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field server string = Samba Server # This option is important for security. It allows you to restrict # connections to machines which are on your local network. The # following example restricts access to two C class networks and # the "loopback" interface. For more examples of the syntax see # the smb.conf man page ; hosts allow = 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 127. # If you want to automatically load your printer list rather # than setting them up individually then you'll need this load printers = yes # you may wish to override the location of the printcap file ; printcap name = /etc/printcap # on SystemV system setting printcap name to lpstat should allow # you to automatically obtain a printer list from the SystemV spool # system ; printcap name = lpstat # It should not be necessary to specify the print system type unless # it is non-standard. Currently supported print systems include: # bsd, sysv, plp, lprng, aix, hpux, qnx ; printing = bsd # Uncomment this if you want a guest account, you must add this to /etc/passwd # otherwise the user "nobody" is used ; guest account = pcguest # this tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine # that connects log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
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# Put a capping on the size of the log files (in Kb). max log size = 50 # Security mode. Most people will want user level security. See # security_level.txt for details. security = user # Use password server option only with security = server ; password server = <NT-Server-Name> # You may wish to use password encryption. Please read # ENCRYPTION.txt, Win95.txt and WinNT.txt in the Samba documentation. # Do not enable this option unless you have read those documents ; encrypt passwords = yes # Using the following line enables you to customise your configuration # on a per machine basis. The %m gets replaced with the netbios name # of the machine that is connecting ; include = /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf.%m # Most people will find that this option gives better performance. # See speed.txt and the manual pages for details socket options = TCP_NODELAY # Configure Samba to use multiple interfaces # If you have multiple network interfaces then you must list them # here. See the man page for details. ; interfaces = 192.168.12.2/24 192.168.13.2/24 # Browser Control Options: # set local master to no if you don't want Samba to become a master # browser on your network. Otherwise the normal election rules apply ; local master = no # OS Level determines the precedence of this server in master browser # elections. The default value should be reasonable ; os level = 33 # Domain Master specifies Samba to be the Domain Master Browser. This # allows Samba to collate browse lists between subnets. Don't use this # if you already have a Windows NT domain controller doing this
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job ; domain master = yes # Preferred Master causes Samba to force a local browser election on startup # and gives it a slightly higher chance of winning the election ; preferred master = yes # Use only if you have an NT server on your network that has been # configured at install time to be a primary domain controller. ; domain controller = <NT-Domain-Controller-SMBName> # Enable this if you want Samba to be a domain logon server for # Windows95 workstations. ; domain logons = yes # # # ; # ; if you enable domain logons then you may want a per-machine or per user logon script run a specific logon batch file per workstation (machine) logon script = %m.bat run a specific logon batch file per username logon script = %U.bat
# Where to store roving profiles (only for Win95 and WinNT) # %L substitutes for this servers netbios name, %U is username # You must uncomment the [Profiles] share below ; logon path = \\%L\Profiles\%U # Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section: # WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable it's WINS Server ; wins support = yes # WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client # Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both ; wins server = w.x.y.z # WINS Proxy - Tells Samba to answer name resolution queries on # behalf of a non WINS capable client, for this to work there must be # at least one WINS Server on the network. The default is NO. ; wins proxy = yes # DNS Proxy - tells Samba whether or not to try to resolve NetBIOS names # via DNS nslookups. The built-in default for versions 1.9.17 is yes, - 219 -
# this has been changed in version 1.9.18 to no. dns proxy = no #============================ Share Definitions ============================== [homes] comment = Home Directories browseable = no writable = yes # Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons ; [netlogon] ; comment = Network Logon Service ; path = /usr/local/samba/lib/netlogon ; guest ok = yes ; writable = no ; share modes = no
# Un-comment the following to provide a specific roving profile share # the default is to use the user's home directory ;[Profiles] ; path = /usr/local/samba/profiles ; browseable = no ; guest ok = yes
# NOTE: If you have a BSD-style print system there is no need to # specifically define each individual printer [printers] comment = All Printers path = /usr/spool/samba browseable = no # Set public = yes to allow user 'guest account' to print guest ok = no writable = no printable = yes # This one is useful for people to share files ;[tmp] ; comment = Temporary file space ; path = /tmp ; read only = no ; public = yes # A publicly accessible directory, but read only, except for
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people in # the "staff" group ;[public] ; comment = Public Stuff ; path = /home/samba ; public = yes ; writable = yes ; printable = no ; write list = @staff # Other examples. # # A private printer, usable only by fred. Spool data will be placed in fred's # home directory. Note that fred must have write access to the spool directory, # wherever it is. ;[fredsprn] ; comment = Fred's Printer ; valid users = fred ; path = /homes/fred ; printer = freds_printer ; public = no ; writable = no ; printable = yes # A private directory, usable only by fred. Note that fred requires write # access to the directory. ;[fredsdir] ; comment = Fred's Service ; path = /usr/somewhere/private ; valid users = fred ; public = no ; writable = yes ; printable = no # a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects # this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could # also use the %U option to tailor it by user name. # The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting. ;[pchome] ; comment = PC Directories ; path = /usr/pc/%m ; public = no ; writable = yes
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# A publicly accessible directory, read/write to all users. Note that all files # created in the directory by users will be owned by the default user, so # any user with access can delete any other user's files. Obviously this # directory must be writable by the default user. Another user could of course # be specified, in which case all files would be owned by that user instead. ;[public] ; path = /usr/somewhere/else/public ; public = yes ; only guest = yes ; writable = yes ; printable = no # The following two entries demonstrate how to share a directory so that two # users can place files there that will be owned by the specific users. In this # setup, the directory should be writable by both users and should have the # sticky bit set on it to prevent abuse. Obviously this could be extended to # as many users as required. ;[myshare] ; comment = Mary's and Fred's stuff ; path = /usr/somewhere/shared ; valid users = mary fred ; public = no ; writable = yes ; printable = no ; create mask = 0765
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