vb.net qr code reader free Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts in Software

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Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
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Figure 4-1 Old enterprise or legacy system
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All data including backup flows on LAN Clients
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Islands of SCSI Disks
Tape drives
Central backup server with network storage
Figure 4-2 The evolution of a centralized backup
Tape drive
Tape drive
Backup servers
Tape Library
Server Tape drive
Server Tape drive
Server
Server
Server
Disk
Disk
Disk
Server
Server
Backup server ParallelSCSI cables
Tape Library
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Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
Configuring SANs: Dos and Don'ts
backup server and the backed-up servers across the LAN. Servers are referred to as clients by backup systems. This methodology worked as long as the LAN could support network traffic in addition to its backups. Even with state-of-the-art LANs, you encountered individual backup clients that were too big to support on an enterprise-wide basis across the LAN. Large amounts of system resources were required on backup servers and clients when backing up these large amounts of data across the LAN. Software backup companies realized that this was going to occur and began to offer support for remote devices. You could decentralize backups by placing tape drives within each backup client. Each client then would be told when and what to back up by central backup servers, and the data would be transferred to locally attached tape drives afterwards. Most major software vendors allowed this to be done through a tape library. You can see the evolution of backups in Figure 4-2. There are connections with one or more tape drives from tape libraries to each backup client maintaining requirements. The physical movement of media within libraries was managed centrally, usually by backup servers. The configuration depicted here is referred to as library sharing. The library is being shared, but the drives are not being shared. When people talk about LAN-free backups, they refer to drive sharing. In drive sharing, multiple hosts maintain shared access to an individual tape drive(s). Library sharing requires dedicated tape drives to back up clients where connected. Tape drives within a shared library remain unused most of the time. If you were to take three servers, as an example, with 1.5 TB of data each, where 5 percent of the data would change daily, resulting in 75 GB of backup data per day per host, and those backups must be completed in 8-hour windows, the host would be backed up in the same window at aggregate transfer rates of 54 MBps for full backups. If you assume that each tape drive is capable of 15 MBps and that each host requires four tape drives to complete the full backup within one night, you would require four tape drives for each server, resulting in a configuration that would look like Figure 4-2. This configuration allows servers to complete backups in the backup window. The many tapes drives allow completion of incremental backups (75 GB) in approximately 20 minutes.
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Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
Figure 4-3 LAN-free backups
Servers with internal storage and FC HBAs FC to SCSI Router
4
FC Switch
Tape Library
If you take these same servers and connect them along with the tape library to a SAN, as illustrated in Figure 4-3, your result would be far different. Each host has a switched fabric SAN via a single 100 MB Fibre Channel connection, along with tape drive connections (if tape drives are supported to Fibre Channel natively), so each can connect to the SAN via switch. If the tape drives connect via standard parallel SCSI cables, you could connect five tape drives to the SAN via Fibre Channel routers. Using four-to-one modeling for Figure 4-3 enables tape drive connects to the SAN via a single Fibre Channel, enhancing performance dramatically.
SAN Configuration
System Requirements and Analysis
Prior to building a SAN, you need to analyze your system requirements. Ask yourself the following questions:
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