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Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
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Configuring SANs: Dos and Don'ts
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Figure 4-15 Extending SANs over MANs
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ity to guarantee that certain data will have certain levels of service, Ethernet, at its best, offers CoSs, basically as a best-effort service. ATM s flexible provisioning ensures that customers receive the bandwidths they pay for when they pay for them. The advantages of ATM may be major pluses from a WAN standpoint; they are much less a factor in the LAN. With Ethernet s cheap and easy bandwidth, throwing extra bandwidth at them can solve QoS and provisioning problems. Throwing bandwidth at a problem is just not a traditional WAN way of solving a problem. And when the costs involved in adding extra bandwidth to a traditional WAN system are considered, this makes perfect sense. However, when your bandwidth prices for 1 Gbps of service are cut from one-fifth to onetenth of customary levels, the more bandwidth approach looks more reasonable in the WAN. The ability of 10 Gb Ethernet to compete with ATM and SONET opens up a market that has never been available to Ethernet. In 2000, combined ATM and SONET revenues were almost $21 billion. In 2004, the combined market will be $40 billion. However, the introduction of Ethernet could change these numbers drastically. From a
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Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
4 revenue standpoint, the overall size of the WAN infrastructure market could fall as less-expensive Ethernet equipment floods the market. However, equipment shipment numbers could rise due to its low cost and ability to provide the extra bandwidth needed for QoS and easy provisioning. Refer to Figure 4-16 for a combined ATM and SONET market comparison. The next 5 years will be interesting ones for the Ethernet world. 10 Gb Ethernet has the LAN locked up. The MAN space is already taking on overtones of the LAN battle part II. It seems that the LAN mindset is working just fine in the MAN space despite MAN s WAN roots. The WAN is where true magic may happen. 10 Gb Ethernet s use of SONET framing in the WAN physical layer asynchronous Ethernet interface sets the stage for 10 Gb Ethernet compatibility with all the traditional carriers legacy equipment. This optional WAN physical layer interface includes a simple, inexpensive SONET framer; it operates at a data rate compatible with the payload rate of OC-192c/SDH VC-4-64c. There are significant invested interests in SONET and ATM, so don t expect these technologies to go down without a fight. It is true that 10 Gb Ethernet has speed (100 Gb Ethernet could be a reality in as little as 4 years), price, simplicity, SONET compat-
Figure 4-16 SONET versus ATM
COMBINED ATM AND SONET/SDH MARKET 2000 & 2004 $40
$0 2000 2001
SONET/SDH
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Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
Configuring SANs: Dos and Don'ts
ibility, and widespread industry support from LAN and WAN vendors. What it does not have is true QoS, provisioning, or the longhaul ranges of SONET. The current advantages of 10 Gb Ethernet are almost the same as the strengths that enabled Ethernet to win over the LAN. These advantages are now allowing it to make inroads in the MAN. It remains to be seen if the WAN market s dynamics are different enough from those of the LAN to negate the effect of Ethernet s current strength. If the WAN market proves susceptible to Ethernet, which appears likely, 10 Gb Ethernet could help inject more reality into the dream of a united topology.
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
ATM is a packet technology, meaning that all the information sent over an ATM network is broken down into packets. Unlike other packet technologies, ATM employs uniformly sized packets, called cells, each of which is 53 bytes long. Because the cells are all the same size, cell delay at ATM switches is more predictable and manageable. ATM was designed specifically to handle broadband applications efficiently and to let users have certain types of traffic priority treatment on the network. For example, voice traffic cannot tolerate much delay and can be marked as high priority with guaranteed bandwidth and minimal delays. Less sensitive traffic, e-mail, for instance, can be marked lower priority. The first 5 bytes of an ATM cell, known as the header, contain an address telling where the cell wants to go in the network. The header specifies priority of the payload information carried in the remaining 48 bytes. ATM networks are linked together by a series of ATM switches that take in cells from various sources and switch them out again. There are two ways to establish connections between the switches. In a permanent virtual circuit (PVC), network managers preset paths from switch to switch ahead of time. PVCs were the initial way to establish virtual circuits between sites before the technology supporting switched virtual circuits (SVCs) was developed.
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