Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts in Software

Making DataMatrix in Software Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts

Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
ECC200 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Data Matrix Creation In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
4
ECC200 Decoder In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Generating Data Matrix In C#
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in VS .NET applications.
Summary
Data Matrix Creator In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in ASP.NET applications.
Encode ECC200 In VS .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET framework applications.
SANs are growing rapidly because they solve problems. The problem is manageability of large and ever-increasing amounts of disk storage. When storage is attached directly to the computer through highspeed cable, the storage device can meet the needs of that computer very well. When computers are networked together, each computer with its own attached storage, total storage resource management is difficult or impossible to achieve. The SAN approach offers many storage management advantages, including the ability to
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Printer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET applications.
USS Code 39 Drawer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Software applications.
Share a pool of storage. Easily grow the size of the storage pool. Balance the load to each physical device. Eliminate downtime. Easily share backup devices. Back up without degrading performance for the network users. Manage storage resource easily and efficiently. Manage computing resource separately from storage resource.
Encode Data Matrix 2d Barcode In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
Creating Code128 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Code128 image in Software applications.
The storage of digital data most of us take for granted as a kind of technological achievement that occurs independent of our recognition and operates solely as a behind-the-scenes process. Within the last 10 years, the Internet has grown from thousands of users to millions (53.5 million in 2001). SAN developments have increased the speed, reliability, and capacity of mass storage technologies, making it possible to save limitless quantities of information. The connections through which these systems exchange data do not always transmit mass quantities of information well. Of the over 70 percent of mission-critical data stored on mainframes, the SAN community has all but ignored legacy systems. The clients, or end users, work from their workstations where stored data are backed up over the LAN. The LAN maintains UNIX, WINNT, Netware, or other legacy system servers types. Islands of SCSI disks process and provide first-level storage of data that are then backed
Encode UCC.EAN - 128 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Software applications.
Bar Code Creator In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Print ANSI/AIM ITF 25 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create 2 of 5 Interleaved image in Software applications.
1D Creation In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create 1D image in ASP.NET applications.
Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
Read EAN-13 Supplement 5 In .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
GTIN - 128 Encoder In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Java applications.
Configuring SANs: Dos and Don'ts
Draw Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create bar code image in iPhone applications.
Barcode Creation In None
Using Barcode printer for Online Control to generate, create barcode image in Online applications.
up to a tape library system. LAN-free backups enable a SAN to share one of the most expensive components of the backup and recovery system, the tape or optical library and the drives within it. The methodology shown in Figure 4-2 worked as long as a LAN could support network traffic and backups. Even with a state-of-theart LAN, you will encounter individual backup clients that are too big to back up enterprise-wide across the LAN. Prior to building a SAN, you need to analyze your system requirements. Develop a SAN architecture that meets your system requirements and analysis. SAN architecture development will require good management in recognizing performance considerations in collecting data and implementing phase cycle development procedures successfully. In 5, Fibre Channel, we delve extensively into Fibre Channel and its products and cabling issues.
GS1 - 13 Creator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Android Control to generate, create GTIN - 13 image in Android applications.
Code 128 Code Set C Maker In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPad Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in iPad applications.
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Configuring SANs: Dos and Don ts
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Source: SANs Demystified
CHAPTER
Fibre Channel
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Fibre Channel
5
Fibre Channel Overview
Fibre Channel is a set of clearly defined standards for communicating data. It is the best technology for applications that require high bandwidth. In addition to high bandwidth, features of Fibre Channel include
Flexible topologies The ability of existing channel and networking protocols to run over the same physical interface and media Connectivity over several kilometers Support for multiple applications, including storage, network, video and clusters
Fibre Channel defines a high-speed protocol originally intended for superworkstations, large-array storage media, and highperformance desktop applications. Additionally, applications originally built using the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) standard can use Fibre Channel. Fibre Channel supports multiple data rates of up to 4 Gbps in switched and shared architectures and in connection-oriented and connectionless modes. The physical media of Fibre Channel will support Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). Data communications may be categorized into two types, channels and networks. Channels are hardware intensive, whereas networks are software intensive. Channels are point-to-point links between communicating devices. Channels operate at hardware speeds, with minimal software overhead, and interconnect only a small number of devices over short distances. Examples of channel data communications include both SCSI and High-Performance Parallel Interfaces (HIPPIs). Networks, on the other hand, provide low- to moderate-speed connections. Networks interconnect many devices, some of which may be physically distributed over long distances. Although networks have a higher software overhead, they are more flexible in supporting a variety of applications. Channels are simple and provide higher performance and guaranteed delivery, whereas networks are more flexible at the cost of
Downloaded from Digital Engineering Library @ McGraw-Hill (www.digitalengineeringlibrary.com) Copyright 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use as given at the website.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.