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6 Pointers and References IN THIS CHAPTER: References Pointers Derived Types Objects and Ivalues Returning a Reference Arrays and Pointers The new Operator The delete Operator Dynamic Arrays Using const with Pointers Arrays of Pointers and Pointers to Arrays NUL,NULL, and void
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When a variable is declared, three fundamental attributes are associated with it: its name, type, and address in memory. For example, the declaration int n; associates the name n, the type int, and the address of some location in memory where the value of n is to be stored. The value of a variable is accessed by means of its name. For example, we can print the value of n with the statement: cout <<n; A variable's address is accessed by means of the address operator &. We can print the address of n with the statement: cout <<&n; The address operator & "operates" on the variable's name to produce its address. It has precedence level 15 (See Appendix B) which is the same level as the logical NOT ! and pre-increment operator ++. Example 6.1 Printing Pointer Values This shows how the value and the address of a variable can be printed: int n=33; cout <<' n=" <<n <<endl; //print value of n cout <<"&n=" <<&n <<endl; //print address of n
n=33 &n=0x3fffd14
You can tell that the second output Ox3fffd14 is an address by the "0x" prefix for hexadecimal format. This address is equal to the decimal number 67,108,116. Displaying a variable's address this way is not very useful. The address operator & has other more important uses. We saw one use in 4: designating reference parameters in a function declaration. That use is closely tied to another: declaring reference variables. References A reference is an alias, a synonym for another variable. It is declared by appending the ampersand & to the reference's type. Example 6.2 Using References Here r is declared a reference for n: int n=33; int& r=n; cout <<" n=" cout <<" n=" cout <<" n=" cout <<"&n=" // r is a reference for n <<n <<",\t r=" <<r <<endl; -n; <<n <<",\t r=" <<r <<endl; r *= 2; <<n <<",\t r=" <<r <<endl; <<&n <<",\t&r=" <<&r <<endl;
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n=33, n=32, n=64, &n=0x3fffd14,
r=33 r=32 r=64 &r=0x3fffd14
The two identifiers n and r are different names for the same variable: they always have the same value. Decrementing n changes both n and r to 32. Doubling r increases both n and r to 64. The last line shows that r and n are aliases. The identifiers n and r are both symbolic names for the same memory location 0x3fffd14. Like a const, a reference must be initialized when it is declared. That should seem reasonable: a synonym must have a something for which it is an alias. Every reference must have a referent. Reference parameters were defined for functions in 4. We see that they work the same way as reference variables: they are synonyms for other variables.
Remember! A reference parameter for a function is just a reference variable whose scope is limited to the function.
We have seen that the ampersand character & has several uses in C++. It can be used as a prefix to a variable name when it returns the address of that variable. When used as a suffix to a type in a variable declaration, it declares the variable to be a synonym for the variable to which it is initialized. When used as a suffix to a type in a function's parameter declaration, it declares the parameter to be a reference parameter for the variable that is passed to it. All of these uses are variations on the same theme: the ampersand refers to the address at which the value is stored.
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