ssrs barcode font pdf < previous page in Software

Make Denso QR Bar Code in Software < previous page

< previous page
QR Decoder In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
QR Code ISO/IEC18004 Drawer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in Software applications.
page_96
Scanning Denso QR Bar Code In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
QR Creator In C#.NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in .NET applications.
next page >
Denso QR Bar Code Creation In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in ASP.NET applications.
QR Code Creator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
< previous page
Draw QR In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in .NET applications.
EAN-13 Drawer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in Software applications.
page_97
UCC - 12 Generator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create GS1 - 12 image in Software applications.
Make Data Matrix In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
next page >
GTIN - 128 Generator In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create EAN128 image in Software applications.
Encoding Barcode In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Page 97
USPS Confirm Service Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create USPS PLANET Barcode image in Software applications.
Create Code39 In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Font applications.
8 Classes In this chapter: Class Declarations Constructors and Initialization Lists Access Functions Private Methods The Copy Constructor Constant Objects Structures Pointers to Objects static Data Members static Function Members A class is is a derived type whose elements are other types. Unlike an array, the elements of a class may have different types. Furthermore, elements of a class may be functions, including operators. Although any region of storage may generally be regarded as an "object," the word is usually used to describe variables whose type is a class. Thus, "object-oriented programming" involves programs that use
Make Code 128C In None
Using Barcode maker for Online Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Online applications.
UPC - 13 Generator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Android Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Android applications.
< previous page
Data Matrix ECC200 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Bar Code Encoder In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPad Control to generate, create bar code image in iPad applications.
page_97
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Creator In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPad Control to generate, create ECC200 image in iPad applications.
Code-39 Generator In None
Using Barcode printer for Excel Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Office Excel applications.
next page >
< previous page
page_98
next page >
Page 98
classes. We think of an object as a self-contained entity that stores its own data and owns its own functions. The functionality of an object gives it life in the sense that it ''knows'' how to do things on its own. There is more to object-oriented programming than just including classes in your programs, but that is the first step. An adequate treatment of the subject is far beyond this introductory outline. Class Declarations Here is a declaration for a class to represent rational numbers:
class Rational { public: void assign (int, int); double convert ( ); void invert ( ); void print ( ); private: int num, den; };
The declaration begins with the keyword class followed by the name of the class and ends the semicolon. This class is named Rational. The functions assign(),convert(),invert(), and print() are called services or methods. The variables num and den are called member data. In this class, all the methods are designated as public, and all the member data are designated as private. Public members are accessible from outside the class, while private members are accessible only from within the class. Preventing outside access is called "information hiding." It allows the programmer to modularize software, making it easier to understand, to debug, and to maintain. Example 8.1. shows how Rationals are implemented and used. Example 8.1 Implementing the Rational Class class Rational { public: void assign(int, int); double convert(); void invert();
< previous page
page_98
next page >
< previous page
page_99
next page >
Page 99
void print ( ); private: int num, den; }; void main() { Rational x; x.assign(22,7); cout <<"x = "; x.print(); cout <<" = "<<x.convert() <<endl; x. invert(); cout <<"l/x = "; x.print(); cout <<endl; } void Rational: :assign(int n, int d) {num = n; den = d;} double Rational: :convert() {return double(num)/den;} void Rational: :invert() {int temp =num; num= den; den=temp;} void Rational: :print() {cout <<num <<'/' <<den;} Here x is declared as an object of the Rational class. Consequently. it has its own internal data members num and den, and it has the ability to call the class methods assign(), convert(), invert(), and print(). Note that a method like invert() is called by prefixing its name with the name of its owner: x. invert(). Indeed, a method can only be called this way. We say that the object x "owns" the call. An object like x is declared as a variable but with type Rational. We think of this as a "user-defined type." C++ allows us to extend the programming language definition by adding our Rational type to the predefined types like int, float, etc. We visualize the object x below: Notice the use of the specifier Rational: as a prefix to each method. This is necessary for each method definition that is given outside of its definition. The scope resolution operator is used to tie the function definition to the Rational class. Without this specifier, the compiler would not know that the function being defined is a method of the Rational class. This
< previous page
page_99
next page >
< previous page
page_100
next page >
Page 100
can be avoided by including the function definitions within declaration, as shown in Ex. 8.2. When an object like the Rational object x in Ex. 8.1 is declared, we say that the class has been instantiated, and we call the object an instance of the class. And just as we may have many variables of the same type, we may have may instances of the same class: Rational x, y, z; Example 8.2 a Self-contained Implementation of Rational The Rational class with its method definitions within the declaration: class Rational { public: void assign(int n, int d) {num=n; den=d;} double convert() {return double(num)/den;} void invert() {int temp=num; num=den; den=temp;} void print() {cout <<num <<'/' <<den;} private: int num, den; }; In most cases, the preferred style is to define the methods outside the class declaration, using the scope resolution operator as shown in Ex. 8.1. This physically separates the declarations from their definitions, consistent with the principle of information hiding. In fact, the definitions are usually put in a separate file and compiled separately. The point is that application programs need only know what the objects can do; they do not need to know how the objects do it. The function declarations tell what they do; the function definitions tell how they do it. This is how the predefined types (int, double, etc.) work.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.