ssrs barcode font pdf < previous page in Software

Making Denso QR Bar Code in Software < previous page

< previous page
QR Recognizer In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
QR Code ISO/IEC18004 Printer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in Software applications.
page_119
Quick Response Code Scanner In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Encoding QR-Code In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
next page >
QR Code JIS X 0510 Maker In .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in ASP.NET applications.
QR Creation In .NET Framework
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in .NET applications.
< previous page
QR-Code Creation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Encode Barcode In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
page_120
Data Matrix ECC200 Generator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Software applications.
Creating Code 128B In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Software applications.
next page >
Barcode Encoder In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
Encoding Code39 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
Page 120
Drawing Intelligent Mail In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create USPS OneCode Solution Barcode image in Software applications.
Print Code 128B In Java
Using Barcode printer for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
with x in place of r. The result is the execution of the line: return os <<r.num <<' / ' <<r.den; which inserts 22/7 into the output stream and returns a reference to cout. Then another call to the standard output operator << and another call to the overloaded operator are made, with the output (a reference to cout) of each call cascading into the next call as input. Finally the last call to operator << is made, passing cout and endl. This flushes the stream, causing the line x=22/7, y=-3/8 to be printed.
Generating GTIN - 12 In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UPC-A image in ASP.NET applications.
Data Matrix ECC200 Drawer In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Font applications.
The syntax for overloading >> is similar to <<. Here, istream is another standard class defined in the iostream.h header file. Here is an example of how custom input can be written: Example 9.9 Overloading the Rational Input Operator >> istream& operator>>(istream& is, Rational& r) { cout <<"\t Numerator: "; is >>r.num; cout <<"\tDenominator: "; is >>r.den; r.reduce ( ); return is; } This version of the input operator includes user prompts to facilitate input. It also includes a call to the utility function reduce ( ). Note that, as a friend, the operator can access this private function. Conversion Operators In our original implementation of Rational we defined the member function convert ( ) to convert from Rational to double: double convert( ) {return double(num)/den; } This requires the member function to be called as x. convert ( ); In keeping with our goal to make objects of the Rational class behave like objects of fundamental types, we will build a conversion function that can be called the same way as ordinary type conversions: n = int (t); y = double (x);
Encode Barcode In None
Using Barcode creator for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create bar code image in Excel applications.
Code 128 Code Set A Creator In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in iPhone applications.
< previous page
Print Bar Code In .NET
Using Barcode maker for Reporting Service Control to generate, create barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
Creating EAN128 In None
Using Barcode maker for Excel Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Office Excel applications.
page_120
next page >
< previous page
This can be done with a conversion operator.
page_121
next page >
Page 121
Our Rational class already has the facility to convert an object from int to Rational. (Rational x (22);) is handled by the default constructor, which assigns 22 to x.num and 1 to x. den. This constructor also handles direct type conversions from type int to type Rational by x = Rational(22);. Constructors of a given class are used to convert from another type to that class type. To convert from the given class type to another type requires a different kind of member function. It is called a conversion operator, and it has a different syntax. If type is the type to which the object is to be converted, then the conversion operator is declared as operator tvpe ( ); For example, a member function of the Rational class that returns an equivalent float would be declared as: operator float(); . If we want to convert to type double, we would declare it as: operator double();. If we want it usable for constant Rationals (like pi), then we would declare it as: operator double() const;. Recall that, in our original implementation of the Rational class we defined the member function convert() for this purpose. Example 9.10 Adding a Conversion Operator to the Rational Class Rational: :operator double ( ) const { return double (num)/den; } Consider the following code fragment: Rational x(-5,8); cout <<"x=" <<x <<", x=" <<double (x) <<endl; const Rational p(22,7); const double pi = double(p); cout <<"p=" <<p <<", pi=" <<pi <<endl; First we use the conversion operator double() to convert the Rational object x into the double -0.625. Then we use it again to convert the constant Rational object p into the constant double pi. Overloading the Increment and Decrement Operators The increment operator ++ and the decrement operator- each have two forms: prefix and postfix. Each of these four forms can be overloaded.
< previous page
page_121
next page >
< previous page
page_122
next page >
Page 122
We'll examine the overloading of the increment operator here. Overloading the decrement operator works the same way. When applied to integer types, the pre-increment operator adds 1 to the value of the object being incremented. This is a unary operator: its single argument is the object being incremented. The syntax for overloading it for a class named T is simply T operator++ ( ); so for our Rational class. it is declared as Rational operator+ + ( ); Example 9.11 a Pre-Increment Operator for the Rational Class This example adds a Rational pre-increment operator ++ to our class. Although we can make this function do whatever we want, it should be consistent with the action that the standard pre-increment operator performs on integer types. That adds 1 to the value of the object before that value is used in the expression. This is equivalent to adding its denominator to its numerator, so we simply add den to num and then return *this, which is the object itself. Rational Rational: :operator++ ( ) { //pre ++ num += den; return *this; } Postfix operators have the same function name as the prefix operators. For example, both the pre-increment and the post-increment operator are named operator++. To distinguish them, C++ specifies that the prefix operator has one argument and the postfix operator has two arguments. (When used. they both appear to have one argument.) So the correct syntax for the prototype for an overloaded post-increment operator is T operator++ (int); Example 9.12 Adding a Rational Post-Increment Operator To be consistent with the ordinary post-increment operator for integer types, this overloaded version should not change the value of x until after it has been assigned to y. To do that, we need a temporary object
The required argument must have type int. This appears a bit strange because no integer is passed to the function when it is invoked. The integer argument is thus a dummy argument, required only so that the postfix operator can be distinguished from the prefix operator.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.