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the relation 22>55 is false. The symbol is called an "operator" because when it is combined with expressions it produces a value. For example, when > is combined with 22 and 55 in the form 22>55, it produces the integer value 0, meaning "false."
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You Need to Know There are six relational operators: <= less than or equal to
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== equal to
> greater than
>= greater than or equal to
!= not equal to
Note the double equals sign == must be used to test for equality. A common error among C++ programmers is to use the single equals sign =. This mistake is difficult to uncover because it does not violate the syntax rules of C++.
Example 2.4 Finding the Maximum of Three Integers This program prints the largest of the three numbers input: int n1, n2, n3; cout <<"Enter three integers: "; cin >>n1 >>n2 >>n3; int max=n1; if (n2>max) max=n2; if (n3>max) max=n3; cout <<"The maximum is " <<max <<endl;
Enter three integers: 22 44 66 The maximum is 66
Enter three integers: 77 33 55 The maximum is 77
On the first run, n1 is 22, n2 is 44, and n3 is 66. First max is assigned 22. Then, since 44 > 22, max is assigned 44. Finally, since 66 > 44, max is assigned 66, and that value is printed. On the second run, n1 is 77, n2 is 33, and n3 is 55. First max is assigned 77. Then, since 33 is not greater than 77, max is unchanged. Finally, since 55 is also not greater than 77, max is again unchanged, and so the value 77 is printed.
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Compound Statements A compound statement is a sequence of statements that is treated as a single statement. C++ identifies a compound statement by enclosing its sequence of statements in curly braces. Here the braces enclose a three-statement block. As a compound statement, it is treated as a statement and can be used wherever any other statement could be used. (In a C++ program everything that follows main () is a compound statement.) { int temp = x; x = y; y = temp; } Example 2.5 Sorting This program reads two integers and outputs them in increasing order: int x, y; cout <<"Enter two ints: "; cin >>x >>y; if (x>y) { int temp=x; x=; y=temp; } cout <<x <<" " <<y <<endl;
Enter two ints: 66 44 44 66
The effect of putting this compound statement in the if statement is that all statements inside the block will be executed if the condition is true. These three statements form a swap, interchanging the values of x and y. This construct is often used in programs that sort data. The variable temp is declared inside the block. That makes it local to the block; i.e., it only exists during the execution of the block. If the condition is false (x<l>y), then temp will never exist. This is an example of localizing objects so that they are created only when needed. Example 2.5 is not the most efficient way to solve the problem. Its purpose is to illustrate compound statements and local variable declarations. If all we want to do is print the two numbers in increasing order; we could do it directly without the temp variable: if (x<l>y) cout <<x <<" " <<y <<endl; else cout <<y <<" " <<x <<endl;
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Keywords A keyword in a programming language is a word that is already defined and is reserved for a single special purpose. We have already seen the keywords char, else, if, int, long, short, signed, and unsigned. The remaining 40 keywords will be described subsequently. They are all described in Appendix A.
Important Point! There are two kinds of keywords: those like if and else which serve as structure markers used to define the syntax of the language, and those like char and int which are actual names of things in the language. In some languages, the structure markers are called reserved words and the predefined names are called standard identifiers.
Compound Conditions Conditions such as n%d and x>y can be combined to form compound conditions. The three logical operators that are used for this purpose are && (and), | | (or), and ! (not). They are defined by p&&q is 1 only when both p and q evaluate to 1 && || ! p||q is 1 when either p or q or both evaluate to 1 !p is to 1 whenever p evaluates to 0
For example, (n%d || x>y) will be true if either n%d is nonzero or if x is greater than y (or both). ! (x>y) is equivalent to x<=y and ! (x<y) is equivalent to x>=y. Definitions of the logical operators can be given by the truth tables: p 0 0 1 1 q 0 1 0 1 p&&q 0 0 0 1
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