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The symbol, called a generic wildcard, means that the type is unknown. The expression extends E means the unknown type must be an extension of the collection s element type E. The ListIterator<E> type is outlined on page 87.
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THE ArrayList AND Vector CLASSES The ArrayList class uses an array to implement the List interface. When the array becomes full, the add() method resizes it by replacing it with one that is twice as big. That is timeconsuming, but it happens infrequently. The array index allows the get() and set() methods to run in constant time, independent of the size of the collection. Also, the no-argument add() method runs in amortized constant time, which means that the time it takes to insert n elements is (on average) proportional to n. It does so by appending the new elements to the end of the list. The indexed add() and remove() methods have to shift subsequences of elements back and forth in the array to accommodate the inserted elements and to fill the gaps left by the deleted elements. Consequently, these operations run in linear time, which means that the time is (on average) proportional to the size of the collection. The Vector class is similar to the ArrayList class, using a resizable array to store its elements. It has 45 methods, including the 3 that it inherits from the AbstractList class. In addition to those 3, the 15 methods specified by the Collection interface (Figure 4.2 on page 71), and the 10 methods specified by the List interface, it implements these 17 Vector methods:
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void addElement(E obj) int capacity() void copyInto(Object[] anArray) E elementAt(int index) Enumeration<E> elements() void ensureCapacity(int minCapacity) E firstElement() int indexOf(Object o, int index) void insertElementAt(E obj, int index) E lastElement() int lastIndexOf(Object o, int index) void removeAllElements() boolean removeElement(Object obj) void removeElementAt(int index) void setElementAt(E obj, int index) void setSize(int newSize) void trimToSize()
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These date back to Java 1.0, which preceded the JCF. Most of them are redundant. For example, the removeElement(Object) method is the same as the remove(Object) method specified by the Collection interface, and the removeElementAt(int) method is the same as the remove(int) method specified by the List interface. THE LinkedList CLASS The LinkedList class uses a doubly linked list to implement the List interface. In addition to the 25 methods specified by the Collection and List interfaces, this class also implements these 11 other methods:
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void addFirst(E o) void addLast(E o) E element()
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E getFirst() E getLast() boolean offer(E o) E peek() E poll() E remove() E removeFirst() E removeLast() The add, get, and remove methods that refer to first and last access the first element and
last element of the list, respectively. For example, the call
list.addFirst(x);
would add the object x to the front of the list, making it the first element. Note that the three remove methods listed here are all obviated by the remove(int) method specified by the List interface. The LinkedList methods remove() and removeFirst() are the same as the List method remove(0). The other five new methods (element(), offer(), peek(), poll(), and remove()) are outlined below. THE ListIterator INTERFACE The ListIterator interface extends the Iterator interface by specifying the six additional methods shown in Figure 4.9. These extra methods require ListIterator objects to be bidirectional. Thus, previous(), hasPrevious(), and previousIndex() act the same way as next(), hasNext(),and nextIndex(), respectively, except in the reverse direction. The ListIterator interface also adds two more optional requirements : the add() and set() methods, to accompany the optional remove() method. Recall (page 72) that the purpose of specifying an optional method in an interface is to recommend the method signature for that method if it is implemented. To avoid implementing the method, the class can simply throw a new UnsupportedOperationException object, as shown on page 72. THE Queue INTERFACE A queue is a waiting line. In computing, a queue is a linear data structure that allows insertions only at one end and deletions only at the other end. As a dynamic data structure, this embodies the first-in-first-out (FIFO) protocol. The most familiar use of the queue data structure is a print queue, which temporarily holds print jobs for a printer. The Queue interface was added to the JCF with Java 5.0. Reflecting the print queue prototype, the Javadoc states that a queue is a collection designed for holding elements prior to processing. It specifies five specialized methods in addition to the 15 methods specified by the Collection interface, overriding the add() method. (See Figure 4.10 on page 89.) The add() and offer() methods insert the specified element at the back of the queue. The only difference between them is their behavior when the queue is full: add() throws an unchecked exception, while offer() returns false. The element() and peek() methods return the element at the front of the queue. The only difference between them is their behavior when the queue is empty: element() throws a NoSuchElementException, while peek() returns null.
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