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The IBM 360 family of computers was the first example of a set of computers which differed in implementation, cost, and capacity, but which shared a common machine instruction set. This allowed programs written for one IBM 360 model to run on other models of the family, and it allowed customers to start with a smaller model, and later move up to a larger model without having to reinvest in programming. At the time, this capability was a breakthrough. Today, most programming is done in higher-level languages, rather than assembly language. When you program in a higher-level language, you write statements in the syntax of your programming language (e.g., Java, C, Python), and the language processor translates your code into the correct set of machine instructions to execute your intent. If you want to run the same program on a different computer with a different instruction set, you can often simply supply your code to the appropriate language processor on the new computer. Your source code may not change, but the translation of your code into machine instructions will be different because the computer instruction sets are different. The language processor has the responsibility to translate standard higher-level programming syntax into the correct machine instruction bit patterns. Machine instructions are represented as patterns of ones and zeros in a computer word, just as numbers and characters are. Some of the bits in the word are set aside to provide the op-code, or operation to perform. Examples of op-codes are ADD, Jump, Compare, and AND. Other bits in the instruction word specify the values to operate on, the operands. An operand might be a register, a memory location, or a value already in the instruction word operand field. An example machine instruction is the following ADD instruction for the Intel x86 computers. The Intel x86 instruction set is an unusually complex one to describe, because Intel has expanded the instruction set as it has evolved the computer family. It would have been easier to create new instruction sets when computing evolved from 16-bit processing in 1978, to 32-bit processing in 1986, to 64-bit processing in 2007. Instead, the Intel engineers very cleverly maintained compatibility with earlier instruction sets, while they added advanced capabilities. This allowed old programs to continue to run on new computers, and that greatly eased upgrades among PC users. The result, however effective technically and commercially, is an instruction set that is somewhat complex to describe. Here is the bit pattern, broken into bytes for readability, which says, Add 40 to the contents of the DX register: 00000001 11000010 00000000 00101000 The first byte is the op-code for ADD immediate (meaning the number to add resides in the instruction word itself). The second byte says that the destination operand is a register, and in particular, the DX register. The third and fourth bytes together comprise the number to add; if you evaluate the binary value of those bits, you will see that the value is 40. To look at the content of a computer word, you cannot tell whether the word contains an instruction or a piece of data. Fetched as an instruction, the bit pattern above means add 40 to the DX register. Retrieved as an integer, the bit pattern means 29,491,240. In the Intel architecture, instructions ( code ) are stored in a separate section of memory from data. When the computer fetches the next instruction, it does so from the code section of memory. This mechanism prevents a type of error that was common with earlier, simpler computer architectures, the accidental execution of data, as if the data were instructions. Here is an example JMP instruction. This says, Set the program counter (transfer control) to address 20,476 in the code: 11101001 11111100 01001111 The first byte is the op-code for JMP direct (meaning the address provided is where we want to go, not a memory location holding the address to which we want to go). The second byte is the low-order byte for the address to which to jump. The third byte is the high-order byte for the address! How odd is that, you may think To get the proper address, we have to take the two bytes and reorder them, like this: 01001111 11111100 This peculiarity is due to the fact that the Intel processor line is historically little endian. That is, it stores the least significant byte of a multiple byte value at the lower (first) address. So, the first byte of a 2-byte address contains the low-order 8 bits, and the second byte contains the high-order 8 bits.
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