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sequence of steps necessary to accomplish the task. The program is like a recipe that the computer will follow mechanically. Procedural languages make up one category of imperative languages, because the statements of the language are imperatives to the computer the steps of the program specify every action of the computer. The other category of imperative languages is object-oriented languages, which we will discuss in more detail later. Most programs today are written in imperative languages, but not all ... In 1958, John McCarthy at MIT developed a very different type of language. This language was LISP (for LISt Processing), and it was modeled on mathematical functions. It is a particularly good language for working with lists of numbers, words, and objects, and it has been widely used in artificial intelligence (AI) work. In mathematics, a function takes arguments and returns a value. LISP works the same way, and LISP is called a functional language as a result. Here is the LISP code that will add two numbers and return the sum: (+ 2 5) This code says the function is addition, and the two numbers to add are 2 and 5. The LISP language processor will return the number 7 as a result. Functional languages are also called declarative languages because the functions are declared, and the execution of the program is simply the evaluation of the functions. We will return to functional languages later. In 1959 a consortium of six computer manufacturers and three US government agencies released Cobol as the computing language for business applications (COmmercial and Business-Oriented Language). Cobol, like FORTRAN, is an imperative, procedural language. To make the code more self-documenting, Cobol was designed to be a remarkably wordy language. The following line adds two numbers and stores the result in a third variable: ADD Y, Z GIVING X. Many students in computer science today regard Cobol as old technology, but even today there are more lines of production code in daily use written in Cobol than in any other language (http://archive.adaic.com/docs/ reports/lawlis/content.htm). Both PL/1 and BASIC were introduced in 1964. These, too, are procedural, imperative languages. IBM designed PL/1 with the plan of unifying scientific and commercial programming. PL/1 was part of the IBM 360 project, and PL/1 was intended to supplant both FORTRAN and Cobol, and become the one language programmers would henceforth use for all projects (Pugh, E., Johnson, L., & Palmer, J. IBM s 360 and Early 370 Systems. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1991). Needless to say, IBM s strategy failed to persuade all those FORTRAN and Cobol programmers. BASIC was designed at Dartmouth by professors Kemeny and Kurtz as a simple language for beginners. BASIC stands for Beginner s All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. Originally BASIC really was simple, too simple, in fact, for production use; it had few data types and drastic restrictions on the length of variable names, for example. Over time, however, an almost countless number of variations of BASIC have been created, and some are very rich in programming power. Microsoft s Visual Basic, for example, is a powerful language rich in modern features. Dennis Ritchie created the very influential third-generation language C in 1971. C was developed as a language with which to write the operating system Unix, and the popularity of C and Unix rose together. C is also an imperative programming language. An important part of C s appeal is its ability to perform low-level manipulations, such as manipulations of individual bits, from a high-level language. C code is also unusually amenable to performance optimization. Even after 34 years, C is neck-and-neck with the much newer Java as the most popular language for new work (http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm). During the 1970s, the language Smalltalk popularized the ideas of object-oriented programming. Objectoriented languages are another subcategory of imperative languages. Both procedural and object-oriented languages are imperative languages. The difference is that object-oriented languages support object-oriented programming practices such as inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism. We will describe these ideas in more detail later. The goal of such practices is to create more robust and reusable modules of code, and hence improve programming productivity. In the mid-1980s, Bjarne Stroustrup, at Cambridge University in Britain, invented an object-oriented language called C++. C++ is a superset of C; any C program is also a C++ program. C++ provides a full set of
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