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algebra applications, some for fast one-off, one-time programs, some for mission-critical, life-dependent applications, some tuned for applications in real-time automation control, and many good ones for general-purpose use. Computer scientists study the general characteristics of computer languages and formal grammars, and usually become proficient in several or many different languages. The term software is used to describe the set of instructions, or programs, that a computer uses to execute an algorithm. Software contains the instructions that direct the operation of the hardware. The software that makes the basic functions of the computer accessible is referred to as system software. System software is responsible for controlling and managing the hardware of a computer system, and for making the computer easy to use for program developers as well as general users. Examples of system software include operating systems, display managers, virus scanners, language processors (called compilers or interpreters to be discussed in the chapter on software), and device drivers. Programs such as word processors or spreadsheets are referred to as application software. Application software is used to accomplish specific tasks. Application software may consist of a single program, or a small collection of programs that work together to accomplish a task for a user of the computer. Operating systems are particularly important and complex system software. They are important because the performance of the operating system has a dramatic influence on the quality of the computer user s experience and the efficiency of the computer system as a whole. In the days of simpler computing systems, in the 1960s and 1970s, a company might purchase a computer without an operating system, with the intention of writing or using its own operating system, but today one always buys an operating system when one buys a computer. The operating system provides easy access to peripheral devices like printers and displays, a file system for storing information like data, documents, and programs, a user interface to make it easy to start application programs, a time-of-day clock, a connection to the Internet using the standard network protocols, a set of calls or methods that application programs can use to request services of the operating system, an efficient algorithm for allocating memory to the various programs active at the same time, and an efficient algorithm for sharing access to the computer among several people and/or programs at the same time. Popular operating systems today include Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, Unix, Linux (a variety of Unix), and IBM s MVS, among others. In fact, the field of operating system development is still a very active one in computer science. Not only are operating systems becoming more complex (adding firewalls and other protections, for example), but operating systems are also becoming more diverse. As simpler devices like thermostats and dishwashers come under computer control, computer scientists have created specialized embedded systems operating systems for those requirements. Even into the 1980s many, if not most, computers were stand-alone not connected to one another. During the 1970s and 1980s computer scientists explored the advantages of computing networks and proposed a number of different physical connections among computers, as well as different networking protocols. At the time there was hot competition among different vendors of computers, each with a different standard, and each hoping to lock in customers by selling its particular networking products. IBM offered System Networking Architecture (SNA), Digital Equipment promoted DECnet, Hewlett Packard offered Distributed Systems (DS), and Xerox offered Xerox Networking Systems (XNS). Even General Motors got into the act, with its Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP). None was directly compatible with any other, but all offered bridges to other systems. Today the problems for computer scientists in networking are different. For the most part, the world has agreed on the IEEE 801 standards and the TCP/IP protocols for the Internet. The problems now have to do with expanding the number of Internet addresses without disrupting the operation of the older installed base, adapting to new and much faster physical connections such as optical fiber, increasing the speed of wireless connections, which are by nature slower and more susceptible to interference, managing larger data transfers such as movies, which also require strict real-time performance so the movie doesn t stop midaction, and providing low-power, low-cost protocols for the ad hoc connection of hundreds or thousands of digital sensors. Supporting almost all applications today is database technology. The dominant database model is the relational database, first offered for commercial use in the 1980s. Computer scientists develop algorithms for storing and retrieving information quickly from absolutely enormous reservoirs of data. How is it, for example,
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