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From the earliest days, efficiency of execution has been a desirable property. In fact, FORTRAN was widely adopted in large part because it created code that was very nearly as fast as assembly language code. Without its characteristic efficiency, FORTRAN would have been adopted much more slowly by the programmers of the 1950s and 1960s who worked in an environment where the cost of running a program was an expensive multiple of the CPU seconds the program consumed. Human readability is another desirable trait in a language. Cobol syntax is as wordy as it is because the designers of Cobol wanted the code to be self-documenting. The designers hoped to guarantee that Cobol would be easy for a human to read, regardless of the commenting style of the author. A language that is easy to implement has an advantage. The language ADA can serve as a contrary example. While ADA is an excellent and carefully designed language, ADA has been adopted more slowly than some others, in part because its size and complexity initially made it more difficult to implement, especially on smaller computers. Computer scientists also praise a language for expressiveness. This is a somewhat subjective judgment, but an example of unusual expressiveness will illustrate the property. Perl offers the if conditional familiar to us in most languages, and Perl also offers the unless conditional, which is the converse of if. Having both forms can be called syntactical sugar, since there is no functional requirement for a language to have both, but having both allows more natural expression of some conditions. Expressiveness is also relative to particular types of applications. C s built-in facilities for manipulating bits mark it as unusually expressive in that way, and make it an especially good language for writing operating systems and drivers. Matlab s matrix manipulation syntax is wonderfully expressive for matrix algebra applications like statistics and image processing. Another very desirable trait in a language is regularity. Regularity means consistency of behavior, consistency of appearance, and avoidance of special cases. In C, an example of an irregularity is the use of the == Boolean operator. Any two values can be compared using ==, but two arrays cannot be compared using ==; arrays must be compared element by element. The == operator cannot be applied in a general way to all data structures. There are almost always good reasons for irregularities, but, other things being equal, a more regular language is more desirable. Computer scientists praise languages that are extensible. Many languages today allow the writer to define new data types, for instance. That was not an option in early versions of FORTRAN, which came on the scene supporting only integers and floating-point data types. Languages can also be extended by adding to libraries of shared routines. A language like LISP even allows the writer to extend the keywords of the language by writing new functions. Standardization is another advantage; a language with a formal standard encourages wider adoption. Ada, C, Cobol, Java, and many others now boast international standards for the languages. Perl, on the other hand, does not Perl is whatever Larry Wall and the Perl Porters decide they want everyone s favorite Swiss Army Chainsaw to be (http://www.perl.com/pub/a/2000/04/whatsnew.html). Another desirable property of a language is machine independence. Java is the best example of a machineindependent language. Given that a Java Virtual Machine is available for the host hardware, the same Java source code should run the same way on any machine. (This promise of write once, run anywhere has largely been fulfilled today, but in the beginning days of Java, the popular quip was, Java: write once, run away. ) On the other hand, programmers using C must keep in mind the hardware platform on which the code will run since, for example, the sizes of data types vary on different machines. An int variable may be 16 bits long on one computer, and 32 bits long on another. The programmer seeking to write a C program to run on multiple platforms must accommodate these differences somehow. Finally, some languages are more secure than others. Strict type checking is one feature designed to enhance security. This was one of the lauded virtues of Pascal, when Pascal was being promoted in the 1980s as the answer to all programming problems. Boundary checking on arrays is another feature designed to promote security, and descriptions of the Java security model boast Java s array boundary checking as an advance over languages such as C. While all these properties may be desirable, they are not all possible to achieve in the same language. For instance, the security of strict type checking probably will reduce some forms of programmer expressiveness (e.g., treating characters as integers, which can be used to improve execution speed in some applications), increase program size, and perhaps reduce ultimate efficiency. Tradeoffs make language design a challenging occupation, and different tradeoffs make different languages more suitable for different types of tasks.
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