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INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE
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Figure 1-5 Hollerrith Tabulator & Sorter, photograph IBM Corporate Archives.
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The 1940s were a decade of dramatic events for the world. World War II changed the face of the world and many lives forever. Although terrible atrocities were taking place during this period, it was also a time of innovation and invention in computing. During the 1940s the first electronic computers were built, primarily to support the war. Unfortunately the clouds of war make it difficult to determine exactly who invented the computer first. Legally, at least in the United States, John Atanasoff is credited as being the inventor of the computer. Atanasoff was a professor of mathematics and physics at Iowa State. Atanasoff was frustrated at the difficulty his graduate students were having finding solutions to large systems of simultaneous algebraic equations for solving differential equations. Like Babbage, almost 100 years earlier, Atanasoff believed that he could build a machine to solve these equations. Working with graduate student Clifford Berry, Atanasoff completed a prototype of his machine near the end of 1939. Atanasoff and Berry sought simplicity in their computer. The Atanasoff Berry
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Figure 1-6 Clifford Berry with the ABC (www.scl.ameslab.gov/ABC/Progress.html).
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Computer (ABC) used only 300 vacuum tubes and was capable of performing arithmetic electronically. Perhaps what is most important about this particular machine is that is operated on base-2 numbers (binary). The ABC did not implement the stored program idea, however, so it was not a general-purpose computer. During the same time period, Howard Aiken was working on the Mark I computer at Harvard University. As completed in 1944, the Mark I contained more than 750,000 parts, including switches, relays, rotating shafts, and clutches. The machine was huge, at 51 feet long, 8 feet high, 2 feet thick, and weighing 5 tons. It had 500 miles of wiring, and three million wire connections. The machine sounded like a roomful of ladies knitting when it was running. Aiken showed that it was possible to build a large-scale automatic computer capable of reliably executing a program.
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Figure 1-7 The Aiden/IBM Mark 1 Computer installed at Harvard, photograph IBM Corporate Archives.
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One of the people who worked with Aiken on the Mark I was Grace Murray Hopper, a freshly commissioned lieutenant in the US Naval Reserve. Hopper was involved with programming the Mark I from the very start. One of her most significant contributions to the field of computing was the concept of a compiler. Hopper was troubled by the mistake-plagued nature of code writing, and developed a piece of software that would translate an entire set of programmer s instructions, written in a high-level symbolic language, into the machine s language. The first compiler developed by Hopper was named A-0, and was written in 1952. Grace Murray Hopper is also credited as the individual who coined the term bug. During the summer of 1947 the Mark II computer, a successor to the Mark I, was acting strangely. At times it would produce the correct answer, and at other times the same program would produce erroneous results. Hopper traced the problem down to a faulty relay within the computer. When she physically examined the relay to correct the problem, she discovered that a moth had been trapped in the relay, causing it to malfunction. Once she removed the moth from the relay, the machine functioned normally. The bug was taped onto a page of the laboratory s notebook with the inscription First actual bug found.
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Figure 1-8 The first computer bug (http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/h96000/h96566kc.htm).
After World War II ended, the allies discovered that Konard Zuse, a German engineer, had been developing computers for use by the Germans. Zuse s first computer, the Z1, was built between 1936 and 1938. The machine contained all of the parts of a modern computer; however, it was not reliable. Its mechanical construction was very complex and error-prone. Zuse s Z3 was the first fully functional program-controlled computer in the world. The Z3 was finished in 1941 and predated Aiken s Mark I. Zuse s accomplishments are all the more incredible given the material and worker shortages in Germany during World War II. Zuse couldn t even obtain paper tape, so he had to make his own by punching holes in discarded movie film. Zuse also invented what might be the first high-level computer language, Plankalkul , though it, too, was unknown outside Germany. The work done by the code breakers at Bletchley Park (between London and Birmingham, UK) during World War II provided the allies with information that literally turned the tide of the war. Computers played a vital role in the work of the code breakers and made it possible for them to break the Enigma and Lorenz ciphers. Colossus, a computer developed at Bletchley Park to break ciphers, became operational in 1943. Colossus was one of the first major computers to employ vacuum tubes, and was capable of reading information stored on paper tape at a rate of 5000 characters per second. Colossus also featured limited programmability. When the allies invaded North Africa in 1942, they discovered that the firing tables they used to aim their artillery were off. This resulted in requests for new ballistics tables that exceeded the ability to compute them. John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert used this opportunity to propose the development of an electronic high-speed vacuum tube computer. Even though many experts predicted that, given the number of vacuum tubes in the machine, it would only run for five minutes without stopping, they were able to obtain the funding to build the machine. Under a cloak of secrecy, they started work on the machine in the spring of 1943. They completed their work on the machine in 1946. The result was the Electronic Numerical Integrator Analyzer and Computer (ENIAC), a machine that weighed 30 tons and was built using 17,468 vacuum tubes and 6000 switches. The machine was more than 1000 times faster than any machine built to date. Unlike modern computers, reprogramming ENIAC required a rewiring of the basic circuits in the machine. ENIAC heralded the dawning of the computer age.
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