ssrs 2008 r2 barcode font Fundamental Principle of Counting: Tree Diagrams in Software

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Fundamental Principle of Counting: Tree Diagrams
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If one thing can be accomplished in n1 different ways and after this a second thing can be accomplished in n2 different ways, . . . , and finally a kth thing can be accomplished in nk different ways, then all k things can be accomplished in the specified order in n1n2 c nk different ways.
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EXAMPLE 1.14
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If a man has 2 shirts and 4 ties, then he has 2 4
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8 ways of choosing a shirt and then a tie.
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A diagram, called a tree diagram because of its appearance (Fig. 1-4), is often used in connection with the above principle.
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EXAMPLE 1.15 Letting the shirts be represented by S1, S2 and the ties by T1, T2, T3, T4, the various ways of choosing a shirt and then a tie are indicated in the tree diagram of Fig. 1-4.
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Fig. 1-4
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CHAPTER 1 Basic Probability
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Permutations
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Suppose that we are given n distinct objects and wish to arrange r of these objects in a line. Since there are n ways of choosing the 1st object, and after this is done, n 1 ways of choosing the 2nd object, . . . , and finally n r 1 ways of choosing the rth object, it follows by the fundamental principle of counting that the number of different arrangements, or permutations as they are often called, is given by
n Pr
1)(n
2) c (n
(25)
where it is noted that the product has r factors. We call n Pr the number of permutations of n objects taken r at a time. In the particular case where r n, (25) becomes
n Pn
1)(n
2) c 1
(26)
which is called n factorial. We can write (25) in terms of factorials as
n Pr
n! (n r)!
(27)
If r
n, we see that (27) and (26) agree only if we have 0!
1, and we shall actually take this as the definition of 0!.
EXAMPLE 1.16 The number of different arrangements, or permutations, consisting of 3 letters each that can be formed from the 7 letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G is
7P 3
7! 4!
7 6 5
Suppose that a set consists of n objects of which n1 are of one type (i.e., indistinguishable from each other), n2 are of a second type, . . . , nk are of a kth type. Here, of course, n n1 n2 c nk. Then the number of different permutations of the objects is
n Pn1, n2, c, nk
n! n1!n2! c nk!
(28)
See Problem 1.25.
EXAMPLE 1.17 The number of different permutations of the 11 letters of the word M I S S I S S I P P I, which consists of 1 M, 4 I s, 4 S s, and 2 P s, is
11! 1!4!4!2!
34,650
Combinations
In a permutation we are interested in the order of arrangement of the objects. For example, abc is a different permutation from bca. In many problems, however, we are interested only in selecting or choosing objects without regard to order. Such selections are called combinations. For example, abc and bca are the same combination. The total number of combinations of r objects selected from n (also called the combinations of n things taken n r at a time) is denoted by nCr or a b. We have (see Problem 1.27) r n r
n! r!(n r)!
(29)
It can also be written
It is easy to show that
n r
1) c (n r!
n Pr
(30)
n r
n n r
nC n r
(31)
CHAPTER 1 Basic Probability
The number of ways in which 3 cards can be chosen or selected from a total of 8 different cards is
EXAMPLE 1.18
Binomial Coefficient
(x y)n xn
8 3
8 7 6 3!
The numbers (29) are often called binomial coefficients because they arise in the binomial expansion n x n 1 y 1
4x3 y 4 x3 y 1
They have many interesting properties.
EXAMPLE 1.19
x4 x4
6x2 y2
4 x2 y2 2
n x n 2
4xy3
2 y2
4 xy3 3 y4
4 y4 4
n y n n
(32)
Stirling s Approximation to n!
When n is large, a direct evaluation of n! may be impractical. In such cases use can be made of the approximate formula n! , 22pn n ne
(33)
where e 2.71828 . . . , which is the base of natural logarithms. The symbol , in (33) means that the ratio of the left side to the right side approaches 1 as n S ` . Computing technology has largely eclipsed the value of Stirling s formula for numerical computations, but the approximation remains valuable for theoretical estimates (see Appendix A).
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