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COMPOSITION AND INHERITANCE
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Here is a test driver for the two classes:
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x x;
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x.a = 22; x-w; tout << 'x.a = ' c-c x.a CC endl; y y; y.a = 44; // assigns y.x: :a = 66; // assigns // invokes y.fO; y.X::f(); // invokes tout << I' y . a = I' C-K y.a CC endl; tout -C-C "y.X::a = ' C-C y.X::a << endl; x z = y; tout << '1z.a = cc z.a << endl;
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44 to the a defined in Y 22 to the a defined in X the f() defined in Y the f() defined in X
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Here, y has access to two different data members named a and two different functions f ( ) . The defaults are the ones defined in the derived class Y. The scope resolution operator : : is used in the form x: : to override the defaults to access the corresponding members defined in the parent class X. When the x object z and initialized with y, its x members are used: z . a is assigned the value y.X::a. This diagram illustrates the three objects x, y, and z:
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Example 11.6 and most of the remaining examples in this chapter are designed to illustrate the intricacies of inheritance. They are not intended to exemplify common programming practice. Instead, they focus on specific aspects of C++ which can then be applied to more general and practical situations. In particular, the method of dominating data members as illustrated in Example 11.6 is rather unusual. Although it is not uncommon to override function members, dominating data members of the same type is rare. More common would be the reuse of the same data name with a different type, like this:
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class Y : public X { public: double a; the data member a in class X had type int
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COMPOSITION AND INHERITANCE
In an inheritance hierarchy, default constructors and destructors behave differently from other member functions. As the following example illustrates, each constructor invokes its parent constructor before executing itself, and each destructor invokes its parent destructor after executing itself:
EXAMPLE 11.7 Parent Constructors and Destructors
class X { public: x() { tout << 'X::X() constructor -x(> { tout << "X::X() destructor 1 ; class Y : public X { public: Y() { tout << 'Y::Y() constructor -Y() { tout << "Y::Y() destructor 1 ;
executing\n'; executing\n';
executing\n'; executing\n";
class Z : public Y { public: Z(int n) { tout CC 'Z: :Z(int) constructor executing\n"; -z() { tout << 'Z: :Z() destructor executing\n'; } >; main0 1 z z(44);
When z is declared, the z : : z ( int ) constructor is called. Before executing, it calls the Y : : Y ( ) constructor which immediately calls the x : : x ( ) constructor. After the x : : x ( ) constructor has finished executing, control returns to the Y: : Y ( > constructor which finishes executing. Then finally the z : : z ( ) constructor finishes executing. The effect is that all the parent default constructors execute in top-down order. The same thing happens with the destructors, except that each destructor executes its own code before calling its parent destructor. So all the parent destructors execute in bottom-up order.
Here is a more realistic example:
COMPOSITION AND INHERITANCE
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EXAMPLE 11.8 Parent Constructors and Destructors
Here is a demo program that uses a base class Person and a derived class Student:
class Person { public: Person(const char* s) { name = new char[strlen(s)+l]; -Person0 { delete [I name; } protected: char* name; > ;
strcpy(name, s); >
class Student : public Person { public: Student(const char* s, const char* m) : Person(s) { major = new char[strlen(m)+l]; strcpy(major, m); } -Student0 { delete [] major; > private: char* major; > ; main0 Person x("Bob"); -t Student y("Sarah",
"Biology");
When x is instantiated, it calls the Per son constructor which allocates 4 bytes of memory to store the string Bob". Then y instantiates, first calling the Person constructor which allocates 6 bytes to store the string Sarah" and then allocating 8 more bytes of memory to store the string B i o 1 ogy". The scope of y terminates before z is instantiated because it is declared within an internal block. At that moment, y s destructor deallocates the 8 bytes used for Biology" and then calls the Per son destructor which deallocates the 6 bytes used for Sarah". Finally the Per son destructor is called to destroy x, deallocating the 4 bytes used for Bob".
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