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The variable s value 44 is stored in the four bytes allocated to it. In C++, you can obtain the address of a variable by using the reference operator &, also called the address operator. The expression &n evaluates to the address of the variable n. 156
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CHAP. 7]
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EXAMPLE 7.1 Printing Pointer Values
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int main() { int n=44; cout << "n = " << n << endl; // prints the value of n cout << "&n = " << &n << endl; // prints the address of n } n = 44 &n = 0x0064fdf0 The output shows that the address of n is 0x0064fdf0 . You can tell that the output 0x0064fdf0 must be an address because it is given in hexadecimal form, identified by its 0x prefix. The decimal form for this number is 6,618,608. (See Appendix G.)
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Displaying the address of a variable this way is not very useful. The reference operator & has other more important uses. We saw one use in 5: designating reference parameters in a function declaration. That use is closely tied to another: declaring reference variables. 7.2 REFERENCES A reference is an alias or synonym for another variable. It is declared by the syntax
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type& ref-name = var-name; where type is the variable s type, ref-name is the name of the reference, and var-name is the
name of the variable. For example, in the declaration
// r is a synonym for n rn is declared to be a reference to the variable n, which must already have been declared. int& rn=n;
EXAMPLE 7.2 Using References
This declares rn as a reference to n: int main() { int n=44; int& rn=n; // r is a synonym for n cout << "n = " << n << ", rn = " << rn << endl; --n; cout << "n = " << n << ", rn = " << rn << endl; rn *= 2; cout << "n = " << n << ", rn = " << rn << endl; } n = 44, rn = 44 n = 43, rn = 43 n = 86, rn = 86 The two identifiers n and rn are different names for the same variable; they always have the same value. Decrementing n changes both n and nr to 32. Doubling rn increases both n and rn to 64.
Like constants, references must be initialized when they are declared. But unlike a constant, a reference must be initialized to a variable, not a literal:
int& rn=44; // ERROR: 44 is not a variable!
(Some compilers may allow this, issuing a warning that a temporary variable had to be created to allocate memory to which the reference rn can refer.)
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Although a reference must be initialized to a variable, references are not variables. A variable is an object; i.e., a block of contiguous bytes in memory used to store accessible information. Different objects must occupy disjoint blocks of memory. EXAMPLE 7.3 References Are Not Separate Variables
int main() { int n=44; int& rn=n; // r is a synonym for n cout << " &n = " << &n << ", &rn = " << &rn << endl; int& rn2=n; // r is another synonym for n int& rn3=rn; // r is another synonym for n cout << "&rn2 = " << &rn2 << ", &rn3 = " << &rn3 << endl; } &n = 0x0064fde4, &rn = 0x0064fde4 &rn2 = 0x0064fde4, &rn3 = 0x0064fde4 0x0064fd04 The first line of output shows that n and rn have the same n 44 address: 0x0064fde4. Thus they are merely different names for int the same object. The second line of output shows that an object can have several references, and that a reference to a reference is the same as a reference to the object to which it refers. In this program, rn rn2 rn3 there is only one object: an int named n with address 0x0064fde4. The names rn, rn2, and rn3 are all references to that same object.
In C++, the reference operator & is used for two distinct purposes. When applied as a prefix to the name of an object, it forms an expression that evaluates to the address of the object. When applied as a suffix to a type T, it names the derived type reference to T . For example, int& is the type reference to int . So in Example 7.3, n is declared to have type int and rn is declared to have type reference to int. C++ actually has five kinds of derived types. If T is a type, then const T is the derived type constant T , T() is the derived type function returning T , T[] is the derived type array of T , T& is the derived type reference to T , and T* is the derived type pointer to T . References are used mostly for reference parameters (See Section 5.10 on page 102.). We see now that they work the same way as reference variables: they are merely synonyms for other variables. Indeed, a reference parameter for a function is really just a reference variable whose scope is limited to the function.
7.3 POINTERS The reference operator & returns the memory address of the variable to which it is applied. We used this in Example 7.1 on page 157 to print the address. We can also store the address in another variable. The type of the variable that stores an address is called a pointer. Pointer variables have the derived type pointer to T , where T is the type of the object to which the pointer points. As mentioned in Section 7.2, that derived type is denoted by T*. For example, the address of an int variable can be stored in a pointer variable of type int*.
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