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Ask questions
Task statement
Draft answer TL Send participation msg before 7:15
Answer questions
Message board Instructor
Submit answer by 10:15
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dag s email
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Fig. 2-19
3. Draw a data ow diagram for the simple library problem. See Fig. 2-20.
new book
CHAPTER 2 Software Process and Other Models
catalog book on shelf book shelve book checked in book check out book borrowed book return book
Fig. 2-20.
Data ow diagram for library problem.
4. Draw a data ow diagram for a factory problem. See Fig. 2-21.
request take an order order make schedule schedule materials build product product filled order fill order
Fig. 2-21.
Factory problem data ow diagram.
5. Draw a data ow diagram for a grocery store. See Fig. 2-22.
grocery list select items
full cart check out
groceries
sales data weekly needs identify needs call supplier order
weekly order
unload delivery
items
stock shelves
filled shelves order
Fig. 2-22.
Grocery store data ow diagram.
6. Draw an object model for a binary tree. See Fig. 2-23.
btree node* tnode addnode() printree() node nval* val node* left node* right nval int value
Fig. 2-23
Binary tree object model.
CHAPTER 2 Software Process and Other Models
7. Draw an instance diagram of the binary tree object model. See Fig. 2-24.
node val left right node val left right node val left right
btree
nval 13 nval 10 node nval 30 val left right nval 12
node nval 20 val left right
Fig. 2-24. Instance diagram for binary tree.
8. Draw an object model for the grocery store problem.
grocery store customer
supplier
Fig. 2-25.
9. Draw an object model for the factory problem. See Fig. 2-26.
order
Grocery store problem object model.
customer
Fig. 2-26.
Factory object model.
AM FL Y
item upc code price quantity sale upc quantity
factory product schedule
See Fig. 2-25.
CHAPTER 2 Software Process and Other Models
10. Write additional scenarios for the patron checking out books from Example 2.11. Fred goes to the library and cannot nd a book to check out. Fred goes to the library and checks out two books. Then he goes back to the library and checks out three more books. Fred returns the second three books on time. Fred returns the rst two books late. 11. Draw a state diagram for a graphical user interface that has a main menu, a le menu with a le open command, and quit commands at each menu. Assume that only one le can be open at a time. See Fig. 2-27.
open file not found enter main menu quit quit file file menu open file file open
close file
Fig. 2-27.
State diagram for GUI.
Note that close le was not mentioned in the problem spec but a transition out of the le open state is required. 12. Extend the following object model for the library problem to include a reservation object so patrons can reserve a book that has all copies checked out. See Fig. 2-28.
library patron name address book title author book copy copy status loan loan status
reservation
Fig. 2-28.
Library object model.
13. Build a state machine for the library problem with the ability to reserve books. See Fig. 2-29.
CHAPTER 2 Software Process and Other Models
on reshelve rack put on shelf put on r no ese tc rved lai me d reserved re tu rn ed
available
returned late
check out
claimed
overdue
overd ue
checked out
Fig. 2-29.
State machine for library problem.
Software Project Management
3.1 Introduction
Although the word manager may remind many of us of the manager in the Dilbert comic strip, management is important. Software project management is the important task of planning, directing, motivating, and coordinating a group of professionals to accomplish software development. Software project management uses many concepts from management in general, but it also has some concerns unique to software development. One such concern is project visibility. The lack of visibility of the software product during software development makes it hard to manage. In many other elds, it is easy to see progress or lack of progress. Many software projects get stalled at 90 percent complete. Ask any programmer if that bug that he or she found is the last bug in the software, and the answer will almost always be an emphatic yes. Many of the techniques in software management are aimed at overcoming this lack of visibility.
Management Approaches
A basic issue in software project management is whether the process or the project is the essential feature being managed. In process-oriented management, the management of the small tasks in the software life cycle is emphasized. In project management, the team achieving the project is emphasized. This results in important di erences in viewpoint. In a process management approach, if the team does not follow the prescribed software life cycle, this would be a major di culty. In a project management approach, success or failure is directly attributed to the team.
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CHAPTER 3 Software Project Management
Team Approaches
Organizing a group of people into an e cient and e ective team can be a di cult task. Letting a team develop its own paradigm can be risky. Choosing a team organization based on the project and the team members may help avoid disaster. One aspect of a team is the amount of structure in the team. While some groups of programmers can work very independently, other groups need strong structure to make progress. The chief programmer team mentioned in the next section is an example of a strongly structured team. In a strongly structured team, small assignments are made to each member. These are often called inch pebbles because the assignments are small milestones. In a weakly structured team, the tasks are usually of longer duration and more open-ended. Some teams consist of people with similar skills. These teams often stay together through many projects. Other teams are composed of people with di erent expertise that are grouped into a team based on the need for speci c skills for a project. This is often called a matrix organization.
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