auto generate barcode vb net Object-Oriented Development in Software

Printer EAN-13 Supplement 5 in Software Object-Oriented Development

Object-Oriented Development
Recognizing EAN13 In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
European Article Number 13 Printer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
grocery store name address
Decode GTIN - 13 In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Encode EAN-13 Supplement 5 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in .NET framework applications.
inventory suppliers customer
Encoding EAN-13 Supplement 5 In .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in ASP.NET applications.
EAN-13 Generator In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in VS .NET applications.
item shipment quantity
Painting EAN13 In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create EAN13 image in .NET applications.
Creating GS1-128 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create USS-128 image in Software applications.
losses
Code 3/9 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Software applications.
Create Code 128 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Code128 image in Software applications.
discount
EAN 13 Creator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
Making Bar Code In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
return
Encode European Article Number 8 In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create GS1 - 8 image in Software applications.
Printing Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create bar code image in ASP.NET applications.
purchase
Printing GS1-128 In Java
Using Barcode creation for Android Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Android applications.
Drawing Bar Code In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET applications.
produce
Encoding GS1 - 13 In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Android Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in Android applications.
Recognize GTIN - 12 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
meat
Code39 Generation In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in ASP.NET applications.
Bar Code Recognizer In VB.NET
Using Barcode Control SDK for .NET Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in .NET applications.
Fig. 11-3
EXAMPLE 11.5
Use the noun-in-text-description method to identify the objects from the following family tree problem: Fred is studying genealogy and wants to build a program to store the information that he finds out about his family. He comes from a large family and has lots of uncles, aunts, and cousins. It is not easy to apply the noun-in-text method to this example. The first sentence is motivation and only the noun family is relevant. The second sentence repeats the noun family and then lists nouns that are relationships between people. Unlike the previous example, these relations are not derived classes. An uncle is not a specialization of person; it is a relationship between persons. Familiarity with the problem domain will be necessary to identify the objects. The good set of objects for this problem is family tree, person, and family. See Fig. 11-4.
family tree
family
person
Fig. 11-4
11.2.2 IDENTIFYING INHERITANCE
Inheritance is the a-kind-of relationship. The base class is the common object and the derived classes are the specialized instances of the common object. A topdown approach is to identify objects that sometimes take special processing or
Object-Oriented Development
sometimes have special attributes. This is usually an e ective approach to nding inheritance. The opposite approach is also sometimes useful. It is a bottom-up approach, which is to group all similar items and look for the commonality. The intersection of all the similar items will become the base class.
EXAMPLE 11.6
Identify the possible inheritance in the grocery store (Example 11.4). A top-down approach would help to realize that the meat department and the produce department have special processing of the items. This would lead to a base class of items and derived classes of meat and produce. An expert in the domain of grocery stores could help to identify all the other derived classes that can occur in a grocery store. Additionally, a bottom-up approach would find the commonality among the objects losses, discount, return, and purchase. This suggests that those objects can be derived from an object transaction. See Fig. 11-5.
grocery store name address
customer inventory suppliers item quantity shipment losses discount return purchase transaction
produce
meat
Fig. 11-5
IDENTIFYING REUSE
Reuse is one of the promises of object-oriented software. However, reuse rarely happens by itself. The rst step in identifying reuse is a task called domain analysis. Domain analysis is the process of reviewing the problem domain to determining what objects and functions are common to all activities. Without good domain knowledge, it will be hard to identify what commonalities exist between all similar systems in that domain. For reuse to be e ective, the parts that will be useful in multiple solutions in that domain must be identi ed. This means understanding the potential commonalities. Approaches to reuse can be top-down or bottom-up. Bottom-up approaches look for low- or middle-level classes that will be common in most solutions in that
Object-Oriented Development
domain. Top-down approaches see the commonality in the framework of the solution and the di erences in the low-level objects. Unless reuse is a goal and identifying potential reuse and designing classes to be reusable is a top priority, reuse will be elusive.
EXAMPLE 11.7
Identify reuse in the grocery store domain (Examples 11.4 and 11.6). In the domain of grocery stores, it would seem that the commonality was in the low-level objects. Most grocery stores handle the same sort of items. Some middle-level activities would have a lot of commonality, for example, inventory systems, stocking, and tracking sales.
11.2.4 USE CASE APPROACH
Another approach to identifying the requirements of a proposed system is to start with identifying the scenarios. This approach views the activities as the best way to determine the necessary functionality and the objects needed to support that functionality.
EXAMPLE 11.8
Write scenarios for the grocery store problem (Example 11.7). Develop a list of objects from the scenarios. Most of the scenarios will be based on general domain knowledge and are not derivable just from the short problem statement. Scenario 1: The inventory is running low; the supplier is sent an order; the order arrives at the shipping dock; the items and quantities are entered into the inventory. Scenario 2: The customer buys groceries and checks out; the customer database is updated (the decision again is made to have the system track customers). Scenario 3: A new customer enters the store and is asked to fill out a new customer information form and receives the membership card. Scenario 4: The produce clerk inspects the produce and throws away the old lettuce; the inventory is updated. From these scenarios, we can easily identify the following objects: inventory, supplier, order, shipment, items, customer, membership card, produce item The inheritance relation between grocery item (base class) and produce item (derived class) is clear.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.