Fig. 4.6 in Visual Studio .NET

Printing QR Code in Visual Studio .NET Fig. 4.6

Fig. 4.6
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Similarly, we add the command
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to the second event procedure. This command simply terminates the computation. Fig. 4.6 shows the completed event procedures for this project. Note the indentation, relative to the first and last lines, of each event procedure. When the project is executed, the window shown in Fig.4.7 appears. Clicking on the Go button results in a display of the current day and date and the current time, as shown in Fig. 4.8.
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Fig. 4.7
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Fig. 4.8
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The computation is ended by clicking on the End button. The Form Design Window shown in Fig. 4.4 then reappears.
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A text box can be restricted to a single-line or it can contain multiple lines, depending on the value assigned to the MultiLine property. Multiline text boxes can be aligned in various ways (left-justified, rightjustified or centered), as determined by the Alignment property; and they can include scroll bars, as determined by the ScrollBars property.
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4.8 ENTERING INPUT DATA (TEXT BOXES) Input data is generally entered through a text box. Typically, the user enters a string from the keyboard when the program is executed. This string is automatically assigned to the text box s text property. If the string represents a number, it can be converted to an actual numerical value by means of the Val function.
EXAMPLE 4.4 ENTERING AND DISPLAYING TEXT
In this example we prompt the user to enter his or her name, and then display the name as a part of a message. We will make use of a text box to enter the data, and a command button to accept the input data and to create the final display. We will also utilize two labels; one for the input prompt, and the other for the final message.
Fig. 4.9
Fig. 4.9 shows the preliminary control layout in the Form Design Window, using standard default names for the form and the controls. In this figure the controls have been stretched to their approximate final sizes, but control properties have not yet been assigned. We now assign the following property values for each object: Object Form1 Label1 Label2 Property Caption Caption Font Caption BackColor Font Visible Caption Font Caption Font Value Welcome to Visual Basic Please enter your first name below: MS Sans Serif, 10-point (none) White MS Sans Serif, 10-point False (none) MS Sans Serif, 10-point Enter MS Sans Serif, 10-point
Text1 Command1
After assigning the property values, the form and the controls were resized and rearranged, as shown in Fig. 4.10.
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VISUAL BASIC CONTROL FUNDAMENTALS
Fig. 4.10
We now add the following commands to the Click event procedure associated with the Enter button (double-click on the command button to display the event procedure in the Code Editor Window):
Label2.Caption = "Hello, " + Text1.Text + "! Label2.BorderStyle = 1 Label2.Visible = True Welcome to Visual Basic."
These commands reassign the property values associated with Label2. The first command combines the word Hello with the user s name and the succeeding text to form the message
Hello, < user s name>! Welcome to Visual Basic.
The second command changes the border of Label2 so that the label will appear indented, in the same manner as a text box. The third command causes Label2 to become visible to the user (it is invisible initially, because the Visible property is initially set to False). The entire event procedure appears as shown below:
Private Sub Command1_Click() Label2.Caption = "Hello, " + Text1.Text + "! Label2.BorderStyle = 1 Label2.Visible = True End Sub
Welcome to Visual Basic."
Fig. 4.11
VISUAL BASIC CONTROL FUNDAMENTALS
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Fig. 4.11 shows a name being entered in the text box during program execution (before clicking on the Enter button). The final screen (after clicking on the Enter button) is shown in Fig. 4.12.
Fig. 4.12
Keep in mind that this example illustrates a technique for entering text by means of a text box, processing the text (combining it with other text), and then displaying the processed text as a second label. We could have displayed the final text within a second text box rather than the label if we had wished. We could also have used the library functions InputBox and MsgBox to enter and display text, respectively. (See Sec. 5.8 for information about the InputBox function, and Secs. 4.13 and 5.7 for information regarding the MsgBox function.)
EXAMPLE 4.5 ENTERING AND DISPLAYING NUMERICAL AND GRAPHICAL DATA (A PIGGY BANK)
This example presents a program that will determine how much money is contained within a piggy bank. The user will enter the number of pennies, number of nickels, number of dimes, number of quarters, and number of half-dollars; the program will then display the total amount of money, in dollars and cents. A graphic will also be displayed, to add interest. Our strategy will be to enter each number as text (through a text box), and then convert each text item to a numerical value using the Val function. A text box and an accompanying label will be used for each type of coin, and for the total amount of money. Note that text boxes are being used both to enter input (the number of pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters and half-dollars), and to display output (the total amount of money). The total amount of money will be determined using the formula T = 0.01P + 0.05N + 0.10D + 0.25Q + 0.50H where T = the total amount of money, in dollars and cents P = the number of pennies N = the number of nickels D = the number of dimes Q = the number of quarters H = the number of half-dollars Fig. 4.13 shows the preliminary control layout, using standard default names for the form and the controls. The square in the upper right portion of the form represents an image box.
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