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MENUS AND DIALOG BOXES
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This causes the form named Form2 to become visible within the currently active project. Moreover, Form2 will be the currently active form, and it will be displayed on top of any other visible forms. If the form.Show method is followed by a 1; e.g.,
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the new form will be displayed as a modal form. That is, the form will remain in place, preventing the activation of any other forms, until the user disposes of the form by accepting it (e.g., by clicking OK), or rejecting it (e.g., by clicking Cancel). The Hide method is directly analogous but opposite to the Show method. Thus, the command
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causes Form2 to no longer be visible within the currently active project. This command does not cause Form2 to be unloaded from the project. Recall that we refer to a property (or method) associated with an object in a single-form project as
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Text1.Text
When working with multiform projects, however, it is often necessary to refer to a property (or method) of an object in a different form. To do so, we precede the object name with the form name; i.e.,
form name.object name.property
For example,
Form2.Text1.Text
Of course, the placement of these references is determined by the program logic.
EXAMPLE 5.7 USING DIALOG BOXES (MULTILINGUAL HELLO REVISITED)
We now present a version of the Multilingual Hello program, originally shown in Examples 4.6 and 4.9. The current version will make use of drop-down menus and dialog boxes, and will require four different forms (a primary form, two dialog boxes that accept input from the user, and a dialog box showing the results).
Fig. 5.22(a)
Fig. 5.22(b)
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MENUS AND DIALOG BOXES
When the program is executed, the primary form will show a menu bar with two entries: Languages and Display. The primary form and the accompanying Languages menu is shown in Fig. 5.22(a). Fig. 5.22(b) shows the primary form and the accompanying Display menu. The ellipses (three dots) following the menu items Color... and Font... in the Display menu indicate that the user must provide additional information within a dialog box before each of the menu items can complete its task. The ellipses are not added automatically; rather, they are typed by the programmer at the end of the menu item s caption. When the user clicks on one of the language selections, a dialog box (i.e., a secondary form) will appear showing the appropriate Hello greeting. For example, Fig. 5.23(a) shows the dialog box resulting from the selection of French within the Languages menu.
Fig. 5.23(a)
Fig. 5.23(b)
The Display menu results in two different dialog boxes that allow the user to alter the appearance of the greeting. The first dialog box (Color...) allows the user to change the color of the text and the background, as shown in Fig. 5.24(a). The second dialog box (Font...), shown in Fig. 5.24(b), allows the user to change the size of the text in the Hello greeting. For example, Fig. 5.23(b) shows the appearance of the greeting when the text is shown in a blue, 12-point font against a gray background. (Unfortunately, the printed page does not show the blue color convincingly, though it really is there.)
Fig. 5.24(a)
Fig. 5.24(b)
Now let s see how this project is created. Fig. 5.25 shows the Form Design Window for the primary form, which has the caption International Hello and is named Form1. The Menu Editor accompanying Form1 is shown in Fig. 5.26. Note that the window in the bottom portion of the Menu Editor lists the menu items in both menus shown in Form1. Each menu item has an associated event procedure. These event procedures control the entire project; they are the key to understanding how the project works.
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