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INTRODUCING VISUAL BASIC
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Defining the Event Procedures The last step is to write the Visual Basic commands that comprise the event procedures. In this example, only the command buttons, labeled Go and End in Fig. 1.13 (originally labeled Command1 and Command2, as shown in Fig. 1.12), have event procedures associated with them. Hence, we must define an event procedure for each of these command buttons.
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INTRODUCING VISUAL BASIC
Fig. 1.12
Fig. 1.13
INTRODUCING VISUAL BASIC
[CHAP. 1
To define the event procedure associated with the Go button, double-click on the button. This will cause the Code Editor Window to be displayed, as shown in Fig. 1.14. Within this window, the first and last line of each event procedure (e.g., Private Sub Command1_Click() and End Sub) are provided automatically, separated by a blank line. The actual Visual Basic commands must be inserted between these two lines.
Fig. 1.14
In the current example, we add the following commands to the first event procedure:
Dim R As Single, A As Single R = Val(Text1.Text) A = 3.141593 * R ^ 2 Text2.Text = Str(A)
The first line is a variable declaration, stating that R and A are single-precision, real variables. The remaining three lines are assignment statements; that is, the information represented by the item on the right-hand side of the equal sign is assigned to the item on the left-hand side. Thus, the first assignment statement assigns the current value of the radius, entered from text box Text1, to the variable R. The second assignment statement computes the area and assigns this value to the variable A. The third assignment statement converts the value of the area to a string and then assigns this string to the Text property of Text2. Similarly, we add the command
to the second event procedure. This command simply terminates the computation. Here is a more detailed explanation of the first event procedure (skip this if you wish it will all be discussed later in this book): Text1 is the name of an object (in this case, a text box) and Text is the name of the object s associated property. Thus, Text1.Text refers to the text associated with text box Text1. Similarly, Text2.Text refers to the text associated with text box Text2. Val and Str are library functions. Val returns a numerical value from a string argument. Str does just the opposite it returns a string from a numeric argument. When the program is executed, the user must enter a value for the radius in text box Text1 and click on the Go button. The radius (Text1.Text) is then converted to a numerical value, represented by the variable R. The area (represented by the variable A) is then calculated, converted to a string, and assigned to Text2.Text. This string is then displayed in text box Text2.
CHAP. 1]
INTRODUCING VISUAL BASIC
Fig. 1.15 shows the completed event procedures for this project. Note that the added commands are indented, relative to the first and last lines of each event procedure. This is not essential, but it is considered good programming practice. The indentation allows each event procedure to be quickly identified and easily read.
Fig. 1.15
Project Execution When the project is executed (by clicking on the Start button in the menu bar), the window shown in Fig. 1.16 appears. Entering a value for the radius and clicking on the Go button results in a display of the corresponding area, as shown in Fig. 1.17.
Fig. 1.16
INTRODUCING VISUAL BASIC
[CHAP. 1
Fig. 1.17
The computation is ended by clicking on the End button. The Form Design Window shown in Fig. 1.13 then reappears.
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