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Working with Basic Classes and Variables
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the Other Four Java primitives
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Java has a total of eight primitives. We have discussed boolean, char, float, and int. These are the four primitives on the SCJA exam. Four more exist in Java but are not on the exam. While they are not required, it is beneficial to understand them in order to have a fuller understanding of the language. The remaining four are byte, short, long, and double. The byte primitive is like an int, but smaller. It stores eight-bit signed integers ranging from 128 to 127 inclusive. A short is also like an int. It is bigger than a byte but smaller than an int. It stores a 16-bit integer ranging from 32768 to 32767 inclusive. The long primitive is also like an int, but twice the size. It stores a 64-bit integer ranging from 263 to 263 1 inclusive. The last primitive is the double. It is like a float and stores up to a 64-bit floating-point number. It holds a value in the range of 5e 324 to a minimum positive non-zero value of 1.8e+308, inclusive. Like the float, this range is rounded and the exact formula can be found in the Java Language Specification. These primitives are not as frequently used as the four on the SCJA. They tend to be used when either a larger value needs to be handled or the code must be optimized for a smaller memory footprint.
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Table 4-1 details all eight Java primitives. For the SCJA exam, it is most important to remember what data type you would use for the data you are storing. The size and range is nice to know but not required for the exam.
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This section will discuss Java objects. Java is an object-oriented language, and as the name implies, understanding what they are and how they work is a fundamental and very important concept. Almost everything you work with in Java is an object. Primitives are one of the few exceptions to this rule. This chapter will discuss what is stored in objects and how they help keep code organized.
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Understanding Primitives, Enumerations, and Objects
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Data type
boolean char byte short int long float double
Used For
true or false Unicode character integer integer integer integer floating point floating point
size
1 bit 16 bits 8 bits 16 bits 32 bits 64 bits 32 bits 64 bits
range
NA \u0000 to \uFFFF (0 to 65,535) 128 to 127 32768 to 32767 2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 2 to 2 1
63 63
On sCJa
Yes Yes No No Yes No
45 +38
Java Primitive Data Types
positive 1.4e to 3.4e positive 5e
324
Yes No
to 1.8e
Understanding Objects
Objects are a more advanced data type than primitives. They internally use primitives and other objects to store their data and contain related code. The data is used to maintain the state of the object, while the code is organized into methods that perform actions on this data. A well-designed class should be clearly defined and easily reused in different applications. This is the fundamental philosophy of an object-oriented language.
Objects vs. Classes and the New Operator
The distinction between objects and classes is important to understand. When a developer writes code, they are creating or modifying a class. A class is the file containing the code that the developer writes. It is a tangible item. A class is like a blueprint to tell the Java Virtual Machine how to create an object at runtime. The new operator tells the Java Virtual Machine to create a new instance of this class, the result of which is an object. Many objects can be built from one class. The following is an example of a class. This class is employed to create an object used to represent a car.
public class Car { int topSpeed; boolean running; Car(int topSpeed, boolean running){ this.running = running; this.topSpeed = topSpeed;
4:
Working with Basic Classes and Variables
} boolean isRunning(){ return running; } }
The preceding class can be used to represent a Car object. The class can store a boolean value that represents whether the car is running and an int value that represents the top speed. From this class, the Java Virtual Machine can create one or many instances of the Car class. Each instance will become its own Car object. In the following code segment, two car objects are created:
Car fastCar = new Car(200,true); Car slowCar = new Car(100,true);
Both fastCar and slowCar are instances of the Car class. The new operator is used to tell the Java Virtual Machine that it needs to create a Car object with the arguments given to the constructor. The new operator will always return a new and independent instance of the class.
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