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C. n int is a primitive and Integer is an object. An int is fastest when performing A calculations. D. This is a trick question. There is no such thing as an Integer. E. This is a trick question. An nteger can be defined to be anything a developer wants I it to be.
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3 C . An int is a primitive, and primitives are faster when performing calculations. An Integer is an object. The capital letter I should help you distinguish objects from primitives.
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A, B, D,and E are incorrect.
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CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES
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Two-Minute Drill
Q&A Self Test
5:
Understanding Variable Scope and Class Construction
CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE
Understanding Variable Scope
Exam Objective 4.2 Given an algorithm as pseudo-code, determine the correct scope for a variable used in the algorithm and develop code to declare variables in any of the following scopes: instance variable, method parameter, and local variable. The last chapter discussed what a variable is and how it is declared to store different values. This section will explore the way variables are organized in your code. As you can imagine, any nontrivial application will have countless variables. If variables could be accessed anywhere in the code, it would be hard to find unique names that still conveyed a meaning. This scenario would also promote bad coding practices. A programmer may try to access a variable that is in a completely different part of the program. To solve these problems, Java has variable scope. Scope refers to the section of code that has access to a declared variable. The scope may be as small as a few lines, or may include the entire class. In this section, we will cover the following topics:
n Local variables n Method parameters n Instance variables
Local Variables
The first variable scope that will be discussed is local variable scope. Local variables are the variables that are declared inside of methods. As the name implies, they are used locally in code. They are commonly declared at the start of a method and in loops but can be declared anywhere in code. A local variable may be a temporary variable that is used just once, or one that is used throughout a method. The block of code that a variable is declared in determines the scope of the local variable. A block of code is determined by braces, { }. For example, if the variable is declared at the start of a method after the left brace { , it would remain in scope until the method is closed with the right brace } . Once a variable goes out of scope, it can no longer be used and its value is lost. The Java Virtual Machine may reallocate the memory that it occupies at any time. A block of code can be created anywhere. They can also be nested inside each other. A variable is in scope for the code block
Understanding Variable Scope
in which it is declared and all code blocks that exist inside it. The most common blocks are for if statements and for or while loops. The following example will demonstrate the use of local variables in code blocks:
void sampleMethod() { // Start of code block A int totalCount = 0; for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) { // Start of code block B int forCount = 0; totalCount++; forCount++; { // Start of code block C int block1Count = 0; totalCount++; forCount++; block1Count++; } // End of code block C { // Start of code block D int block2Count = 0; totalCount++; forCount++; block2Count++; } // End of code block D /* These two variables have no relation to the above ones of the same name */ int block1Count; int block2Count; } // End of code block B } // End of code block A
Code block A is the method. Any variable that is declared in this block is in scope for the entire method. The variable totalCount is declared in block A, therefore it can be accessed from anywhere else in the example method. Code block B starts with the for loop. The variable i is declared in this block. Even though it is not between the brackets, since it was declared in the for statement it is considered to be in code block B. The variable forCount is also declared in block B. Since both of these variables are declared in block B, they are only in scope for block B and any blocks contained within B. They are out of scope for block A, and a compiler error would be generated if they were accessed from this block. Contained in block B is code block C. This block is started arbitrarily. In Java, it is valid to start a block of code at any time, although this is not done often in practice. The variable block1Count is declared in this block. In the preceding example, it is only in scope for block C. However, any code in this block also has access to the
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