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TABlE 9-2
Evolving UML Specifications
OMG Formal UMl Specifications
UML 2.2 UML 2.1.2 UML 2.1.1 UML 2.0
Official Release Date
February 2009 November 2007 August 2007 July 2005
Significant Release Changes
Adoption of the profile diagram, various revisions. Various minor revisions and bug fixes have been resolved. Minor updates including implementation of redefinition and bidirectional association. For this major release, several changes, enhancements, and additions have been made, including enhanced support for structural and behavior models. Various minor revisions and bug fixes have been resolved. The OMG formally adopted UML.
UML 1.3, UML 1.4.X, UML 1.5 UML 1.1
Various November 1997
The SCJA exam requires minimum knowledge of the UML Infrastructure and Superstructure specifications. Of the 14 UML diagram types, the class diagram is the only diagram type on the exam.There is value in understanding UML diagrams and features that are outside the scope of this exam. So in your independent research on UML, don t ignore the other diagram types since this knowledge will surely come in handy later for you at work. The complete set of 14 UML diagrams from the UML 2.2 standard is shown in Table 9-3.
TABlE 9-3
Types of UML Diagrams
Structure Diagram
Class diagram (on the exam) Component diagram Composite structure diagram Deployment diagram Object diagram Package diagram Profile diagram
Behavior Diagram
Activity diagram State machine diagram Use case diagram
Interaction Diagram
Communication diagram Interaction overview diagram Sequence diagram Timing diagram
9:
Representing Object-Oriented Concepts with UML
FIGURE 9-1
UML package icons
java.awt
java.io
java.net
java.swing
java.util
Two closely related UML objectives are on the SCJA exam. One objective relates to the recognitions of simple class structure artifacts and basic OO principles. The other relates to depicting UML features related to class relationships. To start with your first UML element, or in this case let s call it an icon, we ll take a look at the exam-related package icons represented in Figure 9-1. The package icons are typically represented by a folder with the package name located in the top-left compartment (also known as the tab). The package name may also be optionally placed into the larger compartment (as shown in Figure 9-1), as is commonly done when no other UML elements are enclosed in the package icon. Note that the package icon is not on the test, but we include it in many of the diagrams to show packages that enclose depicted classes. It s now a good time to look at the core UML information that will be on the exam. This chapter is filled with details on the representation of these UML elements. When you have completed the chapter, you will be able to recognize all of the core UML elements, as well as relationships between elements.
CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE
Recognizing Representations of Significant UMl Elements
Exam Objective 2.1 Recognize the UML representation of classes, (including attributes and operations, abstract classes, and interfaces), the UML representation of inheritance (both implementation and interface), and the UML representation of class member visibility modifiers (-/private and +/public). Getting acquainted with the different UML elements can actually be quite fun, and the sense of accomplishment when mastering the art of reading and writing class relationship diagrams with UML is equally rewarding. Sun s first UML-related certification objective is geared toward the class diagrams themselves. Attributes and operations compartments and visibility modifiers are
Recognizing Representations of Significant UML Elements
also covered. Once you work though this section, you will know how to recognize the basic class elements of UML. To a strong fundamental extent, you will also be able to create UML diagrams from code and vice versa. The topics listed next will be covered in the following subsections:
n Classes, abstract classes, and interface diagrams n Attributes and operations n Visibility modifiers
Classes, Abstract Classes, and Interface Diagrams
One of the simplest ways to represent classes and interfaces in UML is to show the class diagrams with only their name compartments. This holds true as well with representing interface implementations and class inheritances. Figure 9-2 depicts two interfaces, two classes, one abstract class, and their generalization and realization relationships. Abstract classes, concrete classes, and interfaces are all represented in a rectangle with their names in boldface. Abstract classes are italicized. Interfaces are prefaced by the word interface between guillemet characters (for example, <<interface>>). An interface can be optionally depicted with its name aside the lollipop element. Items contained between guillemet characters are considered to be stereotypes. Stereotypes are extensibility mechanisms that allow designers to extend the vocabulary of UML by creating new model elements. The generalization and realization relationships between the classes in Figure 9-2 are further explained in the following sections.
FIGURE 9-2
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