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Incremental Analysis
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Incremental costs and revenues are those that change with increases or decreases in the production level. Fixed costs as well as variable costs may change under certain conditions. Incremental analysis is an examination of the changes in the costs and revenues related to some proposed course of action, some decision that will alter the production level or change production activity. Two kinds of incremental analyses are explained here.
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11.2.5 The Large New Production Order
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Sometimes it happens that a manufacturer has an opportunity to land a new customer and a very large order for goods. Usually, such a large order cannot be landed without adding new production employees and supervisors and increasing overhead costs. The new order thus creates a decision-making problem in which basic information differs somewhat from the current cost data. A study of the incremental costs and revenues those that arise from the new contract provides information on which the manufacturer can base the decisions to accept or reject the new order. Suppose that a manufacturer currently produces 10,000 product units a year. Fixed costs are $20,000 and variable costs, $5 per unit $2 for materials, $1 for labor, $1 for variable production overhead, and $1 for variable selling expenses. The unit selling price is $10. A new customer wishes to buy 10,000 units a year at $9 per unit. A new night shift would be required to double the plant s production as required by the new customer s order. Costs at the original level of production (10,000 units) are not necessarily accurate for the new level (20,000 units). Assume that the costs of producing the 10,000 additional units required by the new order are estimated as follows:
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Variable costs per unit Materials Labor (including night shift premium) Variable production overhead Variable selling costs Total variable costs Incremental fixed costs Additional supervisors Power, light, heat Office expenses Total incremental fixed costs $10,000 5,000 3,000 $18,000 $2.00 2.00 1.25 0 $5.25
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Original production Gross revenues Variable costs Contribution margin Fixed costs Profit before taxes Return on sales TABLE 11.3
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Financial Results
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New order $90,000 52,000 37,000 18,000 $19,500 21.7%
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Total $190,000 102,000 87,000 38,000 $49,500 26.1%
$100,000 50,000 50,000 20,000 $30,000 30.0%
Note: For accuracy, it is important to use current or projected prices of materials, labor, and overhead in this type of incremental analysis. Average prices or allocated costs derived from historical cost accounting records (for example, material costs based on the first-in, first-out method) may not produce current figures that can be relied on in making a decision. The financial results of accepting the new contract would therefore be as shown in Table 11.3. The incremental analysis shows that the new contract will be profitable, but the rate of return will not be as high as for the original level of production. The computation would have given different results if the original variable costs of $5 per unit and the fixed cost of $20,000 had been used. Incremental analysis makes it possible for a manufacturer to examine the probable results of making major changes in the production level and in the arrangement and scheduling of production activity.
Make versus Buy
Most manufacturing firms buy some parts from outside suppliers for use in assembling the finished products. Often, the manufacturing firm could make the part in its own plant instead of buying it from an outside source. The question is whether the cost of making the product itself would be less than the cost of purchasing it from an outside supplier. An analysis of these two alternatives is known as a make-orbuy analysis. Take, for example, a manufacturing firm that now purchases 10,000 small electric motors a year at $4.80 each after deducting quantity discounts. The question it faces is this: Can it make the motor itself for $4.80 or less Assume that the costs of producing 10,000 motors a year in its own plant would be as follows:
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