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EXCESS GAIN
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FIGURE 2.32
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Photoelectric excess gain and range.
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Environment Relatively clean Office clean Lightly dirty Warehouse, post office Dirty Steel mill, saw mill Very dirty Steam tunnel, painting rubber or grinding, cutting with coolant, paper plant Extremely dirty Coal bins or areas where thick layers build quickly
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Through-beam 1.25 per side 1.6 total 1.8 per side 3.2 total 8 per side 64 total 25 per side 626 total
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Reflex 1.6 per side 2.6 total 3.2 per side 10.5 total 64 per side
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2.6 total
3.2 total
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100 per side 10,000 total
TABLE 2.4 Excess Gain Chart
General guidelines can be provided for the quantity of excess gain required for the amount of contamination in an environment. Environments are classified as one of the following: relatively clean, lightly dirty, dirty, very dirty, and extremely dirty. Table 1.4 illustrates the excess gain recommended for these types of environments for each sensing mode.
Example. If in a through-beam setup, the source is in a lightly dirty environment where excess gain is 1.8, and the detector is in a very dirty environment where excess gain is 25, the recommended excess gain is 1.8 25 = 45, from Table 1.4.
Proximity Sensors
Proximity sensing is the technique of detecting the presence or absence of an object with an electronic noncontact sensor. Mechanical limit switches were the first devices to detect objects in industrial applications. A mechanical arm touching the target object moves a plunger or rotates a shaft, which causes an electrical contact to close or open. Subsequent signals will produce other control functions through the connecting system. The switch may be activating a simple control relay, or a sophisticated programmable logic
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control device, or a direct interface to a computer network. This simple activity, once done successfully, will enable varieties of manufacturing operations to direct a combination of production plans according to the computer-integrated manufacturing strategy. Inductive proximity sensors are used in place of limit switches for noncontact sensing of metallic objects. Capacitive proximity switches are used on the same basis as inductive proximity sensors; however, capacitive sensors can also detect nonmetallic objects. Both inductive and capacitive sensors are limit switches with ranges up to 100 mm. The distinct advantage of photoelectric sensors over inductive or capacitive sensors is their increased range. However, dirt, oil mist, and other environmental factors will hinder operation of photoelectric sensors during the vital operation of reporting the status of a manufacturing process. This may lead to significant waste and buildup of false data.
2.5.1 Typical Applications of Inductive Proximity Sensors
Motion position detection (Fig. 2.33): Detection of rotating motion Zero-speed indication Speed regulation Motion control (Fig. 2.34): Shaft travel limiting Movement indication Valve open/closed
FIGURE 2.33 Motion/ position detection with inductive proximity sensor.
FIGURE 2.34 Motion control, inductive proximity sensor.
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FIGURE 2.35 Conveyer system control, inductive proximity sensor.
FIGURE 2.36 Process control, inductive proximity sensor.
Conveyer system control (Fig. 2.35): Transfer lines Assembly line control Packaging machine control Process control (Fig 2.36): Product complete Automatic filling Product selection Machine control (Fig. 2.37): Fault condition indication Broken tool indication Sequence control Verification and counting (Fig. 2.38): Product selection Return loop control Product count
FIGURE 2.37 Machine control, inductive proximity sensor.
FIGURE 2.38 Veri cation and counting, inductive proximity sensor.
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FIGURE 2.39 Liquid level detection, capacitive proximity sensor.
FIGURE 2.40 Bulk material level control, capacitive proximity sensor.
FIGURE 2.41 Process control, capacitive proximity sensor.
2.5.2 Typical Applications of Capacitive Proximity Sensors
Liquid level detection (Fig. 2.39): Tube high/low liquid level Overflow limit Dry tank Bulk material level control (Fig. 2.40): Low level limit Overflow limit Material present Process control (Fig. 2.41): Product present Bottle fill level Product count
Understanding Inductive Proximity Sensors
2.6.1 Principles of Operation
An inductive proximity sensor consists of four basic elements (Fig. 2.42): Sensor coil and ferrite core Oscillator circuit Detector circuit Solid-state output circuit
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FIGURE 2.42 Operating principle of inductive proximity sensor.
The oscillator circuit generates a radio-frequency electromagnetic field that radiates from the ferrite core and coil assembly. The field is centered around the axis of the ferrite core, which shapes the field and directs it at the sensor face. When a metal target approaches and enters the field, eddy currents are induced into the surfaces of the target. This results in a loading effect, or damping, that causes a reduction in amplitude of the oscillator signal (Fig. 2.43).
FIGURE 2.43 Induced eddy current.
Target Sensor
Two
Oscillator circuit output Operating level Wave detecting circuit output Output circuit OFF ON Releasing level
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