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FIGURE 3.15 Jacketed glass bers.
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Fiber Optics in Sensors and Control Systems
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FIGURE 3.16
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Individual ber-optic assembly.
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FIGURE 3.17 Bifurcated ber-optic assembly.
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There are two basic styles of fiber-optic assemblies: (1) individual fiber optics (Fig. 3.16) and (2) bifurcated fiber optics (Fig. 3.17). Individual fiber-optic assemblies guide light from an emitter to a sensing location, or to a receiver from a sensing location. Bifurcated fibers use half their fiber area to transmit light and the other half to receive light.
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Individual Fiber Optics
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A fiber-optic assembly having one control end and one sensing end is used for piping photoelectric light from an emitter to the sensing location or from the sensing location back to a receiver. It is usually used in pairs in the opposed sensing mode, but can also be used side by side in the diffuse proximity mode or angled for the specular reflection or mechanical convergent mode.
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A bifurcated fiber-optic assembly is branched to combine emitted light with received light in the same assembly. Bifurcated fibers are used for diffused (divergent) proximity sensing, or they may be equipped with a lens for use in the retroreflective mode. Three types of sensing modes are used in positioning a sensor so the maximum amount of emitted energy reaches the receiver sensing element: Opposed sensing mode (Fig. 3.18) Retroreflective sensing mode (Fig. 3.19) Proximity (diffused) sensing mode (Fig. 3.20)
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Three
FIGURE 3.18 Opposed sensing mode. For alignment, move emitter or receiver up-down, left-right, and rotate.
FIGURE 3.19 Retrore ective sensing mode. For alignment, move target up-down, left-right.
Rotate left-right Emitted light Rotate up-down Object Received light
FIGURE 3.20 Proximity sensing mode. For alignment, rotate up-down, left-right.
Fiber Optics in Sensors and Control Systems
Opposed sensing is the most efficient photoelectric sensing mode and offers the highest level of optical energy to overcome lens contamination, sensor misalignment, and long scanning ranges. It is also often referred to as direct scanning and sometimes called the beam break mode. The addition of fiber optics to photoelectric sensing has greatly expanded the application of photoelectric devices. Because they are small in diameter and flexible, optical fibers can bend and twist into tiny places formerly inaccessible to bulky electronic devices. Optical fibers operate in the same sensing modes as standard photoelectric controls through-beam, proximity, and reflex. The sizes and shapes of sensing tips have been developed to accommodate many applications. Optical fibers have a few drawbacks: Limited sensing distance. Typical sensing distance in the proximity mode is 80 mm; 380 mm for the through-beam mode. Typically more expensive than other photoelectric sensing controls. Easily fooled by a small drop of water or dirt over the sensing surface. Optical fibers advantages: Sensing in confined places. Ability to bend around corners. No electronics at sensing point. Operation at high temperatures (glass). Total immunity from electrical noise and interference. Easily cut to desired lengths (plastic).
Optical Fiber Parameters
The most important parameters affecting optical-fiber performance are: Excess gain Background suppression Contrast Polarization
Excess Gain
Excess gain is the measure of energy available between the source and the detector to overcome signal loss due to dirt or contamination.
Three
FIGURE 3.21
Excess gain curves.
Excess gain is the single most important consideration in choosing a photoelectric control in manufacturing. It is the extra punch that the sensor has available within its detecting region. By definition, excess gain is the ratio of the amount of light the detector sees to the minimum amount of light required to trip the sensor. This ratio is depicted graphically for all photoelectric sensors. In Fig. 3.21, excess gain is plotted along the vertical logarithmic axis, starting at 1, the minimum amount of light required to trigger the detector. Every point above 1 represents the amount of light required to trigger the photoelectric control the excess gain. Often, the standard of comparison for choosing between different photoelectric sensors is range. Actually, more important to most applications is the excess gain. For a typical application, the higher the excess gain within the sensing region, the more likely the application will work. It is the extra margin that will determine whether the photoelectric control will continue to operate despite the buildup of dirt on the lens or the presence of contamination in the air.
Example. An application requires detecting boxes on a conveyer in a filthy industrial environment (Fig. 3.22). The boxes will pass about 2 to 5 mm from
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