how to create barcode in vb.net 2008 Proximity Sensor in Software

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Sensing distance between box and sensor is 2-5 inches
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FIGURE 3.22
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FIGURE 3.23 Excess gain curve for sensor 1.
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FIGURE 3.24 Excess gain curve for sensor 3.
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the sensor as they move along the conveyer at the sensing location. Given a choice between the two proximity sensors (whose excess gain curves appear in Figs. 3.23 and 3.24), which photoelectric control should be selected for this application
If the decision were based solely on specified range, the unit described in Fig. 3.23 would be selected. However, if units were installed in this application, it might fail after a short time in operation. Over time, contaminants from the environment would settle on the lens, decreasing the amount of light the sensor sees. Eventually, enough lens contamination would accumulate that the photoelectric control would not have enough excess gain to overcome the signal loss created by the coating, and the application would fail. A better choice for this application would be the unit represented in Fig. 3.24. It delivers much more excess gain in the operating region required for this application and will therefore work much more successfully than the other unit.
Background Suppression
Background suppression enables a diffuse photoelectric sensor to have high excess gain to a predetermined limit and insufficient excess gain beyond that range, where it might pick up objects in motion and yield a false detection. By using triangular ranging, sensor developers have created a sensor that emits light that reflects on the detector from two different target positions. The signal received from the more distant target is subtracted from that of the closer target, providing high excess gain for the closer target.
Three
FIGURE 3.25
Polarization.
Contrast
Contrast measures the ability of a photoelectric control to detect an object; it is the ratio of the excess gain under illumination to the excess gain in the dark. All other things being equal, the sensor that provides the greatest contrast ratio should be selected. For reliable operation, a ratio 10:1 is recommended.
Polarization
Polarization is used in reflection sensors in applications where shiny surfaces, such as metal or shrink-wrapped boxes, may trigger the control falsely. The polarizer passes light along only one plane (Fig. 3.25), and the corner-cube reflectors depolarize the light as it passes through the plastic face of the retroreflector (Fig. 3.10). Only light that has been rotated by the corner-cube retroreflector can pass through the polarizer, whereas light that bounces off other shiny objects cannot. Like regular reflex photoelectric sensors, polarized sensors have a high light/dark contrast ratio and are simple to install and align. However, the polarizers do limit the sensor s operating range because light is lost passing through them.
Inductive Proximity Sensors Noncontact Metal Detection
Inductive proximity sensors are another common choice for position sensing. An inductive proximity sensor consists of four basic elements: The sensor, which comprises a coil and ferrous core An oscillator circuit A detector circuit A solid-state output
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FIGURE 3.26 Inductive proximity sensor.
In the circuitry in Fig. 3.26, the oscillator generates an electromagnetic field that radiates from the sensor s face. This field is centered around the axis and detected by the ferrite core to the front of the sensor assembly. When a metal object enters the electromagnetic field, eddy currents are induced in the surface of the target. This loads in the oscillator circuit, which reduces its amplitude. The detector circuit detects the change in the oscillator amplitude and, depending on its programming, switches ON and OFF at a specific oscillator amplitude. The sensing circuit returns to its normal state when the target leaves the sensing area and the oscillator circuit regenerates. The nominal sensing range of inductive proximity sensors is a function of the diameter of the sensor and the power that is available to generate the electromagnetic field. This is subject to a manufacturing tolerance of 10 percent, as well as a temperature drift tolerance of 10 percent. The target size, shape, and material will have an effect on the sensing range. Smaller targets will reduce the sensing range, as will targets that are not flat or are made of nonferrous material. Basically two types of inductive proximity sensors are used: (1) shielded and (2) nonshielded. The shielded version has a metal cover around the ferrite core and coil assembly. This focuses the electromagnetic field to the front of the sensor and allows it to be imbedded in metal without influencing the sensing range. The nonshielded sensor can sense on the side as well as in front of a sensor. It requires a nonmetallic area around the sensor to operate correctly. Inductive proximity sensors have several benefits: High repeatability. Visibility of the environment is not an issue, since inductive proximity sensors can sense only electromagnetic fields. Therefore, environments from dirt to sunlight pose no problem for inductive proximity sensors. Also, because they are noncontact sensors, nothing wears.
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