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FIGURE 3.40 Ring coupler.
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sufficient optical power to tolerate a bypassed repeater. Another contingency method is to provide for the transmitting node to read its own data coming around the ring, and to retransmit in the other direction if necessary, as illustrated in Fig. 3.40. Yet another is to provide for a second pair of fibers paralleling the first, but routed on a physically different path.
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3.12.6.3 The Passive Star Coupler
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Certain systems have attempted to utilize a fiber-optic coupling technology offered from the telecommunications and data communications applications areas. When successful, this technique allows tapping into fiber-optic trunk lines, a direct parallel with coaxial or twin axial systems. Light entering into the tap or coupler is split into a given number of output channels. The amount of light in any output channel is determined by the total amount of light input, less system losses, divided by the number of output channels. Additional losses are incurred at the junction of the main data-carrying fibers with the fiber leads from the tap or star. As such, passive couplers are limited to systems with few drops and moderate distances. Also, it is important to minimize termination losses at the coupler caused by the already diminished light output from the coupler. A partial solution is an active in-line repeater, but a superior solution, the active star coupler, is described next.
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3.12.6.4 The Active Star Coupler
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The basic principle of the active star coupler is that any light signal received as an input is converted to an electrical signal, amplified, and reconverted to optical signals on all other output channels. Figure 3.41 illustrates an eight-port active star coupler, containing eight sets of fiber-optic input/output (I/O) ports. A signal received on the channel 1 input will be transmitted on the channel 2 to 8 output ports. One may visualize the use of the active star coupler as aggregating a number of taps into one box. Should the number of
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Fiber Optics in Sensors and Control Systems
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FIGURE 3.41 Eight-port active star coupler.
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required taps exceed the number of available I/O ports, or should it be desirable to place these tap boxes at several locations in the system, the active star couplers may be jumpered together optically by tying a pair of I/O ports on one coupler to that on another in a huband-spoke system. With the active star coupler serving as the hub of the data bus network, any message broadcast by a unit on the network is retransmitted to all other units on the network. A response of these other units is broadcast back to the rest of the network through the star, as in an electrical wired data bus network.
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Configurations of Fiber Optics for Sensors
Fiber-optic sensors for general industrial use have largely been restricted to applications in which their small size has made them convenient replacements for conventional photoelectric sensors. Until recently, fiber-optic sensors have almost exclusively employed standard bundle technology, whereby thin glass fibers are bundled together to form flexible conduits for light. Recently, however, the advances in fiber optics for data communications have introduced an entirely new dimension into optical sensing technology. Combined with novel but effective transducing technology, they set the stage for a powerful class of fiber-optic sensors.
Fiber-Optic Bundles
A typical fiber-optic sensor probe, often referred to as a bundle (Fig. 3.42), is 1.25 to 3.15 mm in diameter and made of individual fiber elements approximately 0.05 mm in diameter. An average
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FIGURE 3.42 Fiber-optic sensor probe.
bundle will contain up to several thousand fiber elements, each working on the conventional fiber-optic principle of total internal reflection. Composite bundles of fibers have an acceptance cone of the light based on the numerical aperture of the individual fiber elements. NA = sin
2 2 = n1 n2
where n1 > n2 and = half the cone angle. Bundles normally have NA values in excess of 0.5 (an acceptance cone full angle greater than 60 ), contrasted with individual fibers for long-distance, high-data-rate applications, which have NA values approaching 0.2 (an acceptance cone full angle of approximately 20 ). The ability of fiber-optic bundles to readily accept light, as well as their large total cross-sectional surface area, have made them an acceptable choice for guiding light to a remote target and from the target area back to a detector element. This has been successfully accomplished by using the pipe as an appendage to conventional photoelectric sensors, proven devices conveniently prepackaged with adequate light source and detector elements. Bundles are most often used in either opposed beam or reflective mode. In the opposed beam mode, one fiber bundle pipes light from the light source and illuminates a second bundle placed on the same axis at some distance away which carries light back to the detector. An object passing between the bundles prevents light from reaching the detector. In the reflective mode, all fibers are usually contained in one probe but divided into two legs at some junction point in an arrangement known as bifurcate. One bifurcate leg is then tied to the light source and the other to the detector (Fig. 3.43). Reflection from a target provides a return path to the detector for the light. The target may be fixed so it breaks the beam, or it may be moving so that, when present in the probe s field of view, it reflects the beam.
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