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FIGURE 3.66
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Simplex ber-optic cable.
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FIGURE 3.67
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Zipcord ber-optic cable.
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Loose tie wrapping Subchannels for breakout cables Zipcord fiber-optic cables (Fig. 3.67) are used in: Light-duty (two-way) transmission Indoor runs in cable trays Short conduits Tie wrapping Multichannel fiber-optic cables (Fig. 3.68) are used in: Outdoor environments Multifiber runs where each channel is connectorized and routed separately Aerial runs Long conduit pulls Two, four, and six channels (standard) Eight to eighteen channels Heavy-duty duplex fiber-optic cables (Fig. 3.69) are used in: Rugged applications Wide-temperature-range environments
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FIGURE 3.68
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Fiber Optics in Sensors and Control Systems
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Heavy-duty ber-optic cable.
Direct burial Loose tube subchannel design High-tensile-stress applications Table 3.1 summarizes fiber-optic cable characteristics.
Channels Characteristics Simplex Cable diameter, 2.5 mm Weight, kg/km Jacket type Jacket color Pull tension Max. long-term tension Max. break strength 6.5 PVC Orange 330 N 200 N 890 N Zipcord Duplex 2 4 8 41 PE Black 870 N 6 10 61 PE Black 1425 N 2.5 5.4 3.5 6 8 11 PVC Orange 490 N 310 N 1340 N 100 >5000 25 20 PVC Orange 670 N 400 N 41 PE Black 890 N 525 N
1150 N 2490 N
1780 N 2370 N 4000 N 11,000 N 150 >5000 25 200 >2000 50 200 >2000 50 200 >2000 75
Impact strength 100 at 1.6 N m Cyclic flexing, cycles Minimum bend radius, mm Cable attenuation Operating temperature Storage temperature TABLE 3.1 >5000 25
0.6 dB/km at 820 nm 40 to + 85 C 40 to + 85 C
Fiber-Optic Cable Characteristics
(overcurrent protection)
I HIGH VOLTAGE AREA Instrumented conductor R1 D1 D2 +V D3 D4 V D5 LED R2 Rs +V A1 + V R3 + D6 fiber optic cables + REMOTE SAFE AREA same as above +
FIGURE 3.70
Fiber-optic current monitor.
Fiber Optics in Sensors and Control Systems
Fiber-Optic Ammeter
In many applications, including the fusion reactors, radio frequency systems, and telemetry systems, it is often necessary to measure the magnitude and frequency of current flowing through a circuit in which high DC voltages are present. A fiber-optic current monitor (Fig. 3.70) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in response to a transient voltage breakdown problem that caused failures of Hall-effect devices used in the Tokamak fusion test reactor s natural-beam heating systems. The fiber-optic current monitor measures low current in a conductor at a very high voltage. Typical voltages range between tens of kilovolts and several hundred kilovolts. With a dead band of approximately 3 mA, the circuit derives its power from the conductor being measured and couples information to a (safe) area by means of fiber optics. The frequency response is normally from direct current to 100 kHz, and a typical magnitude range is between 5 and 600 mA. The system is composed of an inverting amplifier, a current regulator, transorbs, diodes, resistors, and a fiber-optic cable. Around an inverting amplifier, a light-emitting diode and a photodiode form an optical closed feedback loop. A fraction of the light emitted by the LED is coupled to the fiber-optic cable. As the current flows through the first diode, it splits between the 1.5-mA current regulator and the sampling resistor. The voltage across the sampling resistor causes a small current to flow into the inverting amplifier summing junction and is proportional to the current in the sampling resistor. Since photodiodes are quite linear, the light power from the LED is proportional to the current through the sampling resistor. The light is split between the local photodiode and the fiber cable. A photodiode, located in a remote safe area, receives light that is linearly proportional to the conductor current (for current greater than 5 mA and less than 600 mA). To protect against fault conditions, the design utilizes two back-toback transorbs in parallel with the monitor circuit. The transorbs are rated for 400 A for 1 ms. The fiber-optic ammeter is an effective tool for fusion research and other applications where high voltage is present.
Further Reading
Berwick, M., J.D.C. Jones, and D. A. Jackson, Alternating Current Measurement and Non-Invasive Data Ring Utilizing the Faraday Effect in a Closed Loop Fiber Magnetometer, Optics Lett., 12(294) (1987). Cole, J. H., B. A. Danver, and J. A. Bucaro, Synthetic Heterodyne Interferometric Demodulation, IEEE J. Quant. Electron., QE-18(684) (1982). Dandridge, A., and A. B. Tveten, Phase Compensation in Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors, Optics Lett., 7(279) (1982). Desforges, F. X., L. B. Jeunhomme, Ph. Graindorge, and G. L. Baudec, Fiber Optic Microswitch for Industrial Use, presented at SPIE O-E Fiber Conf., San Diego, no. 838 41 (1987).
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