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Networking of Sensors and Control Systems in Manufacturing
Understanding Networks in Manufacturing
A seemingly simple problem in the development of computer networks is to establish the ability to interconnect any two computer system elements. This might involve a computer terminal, a modem, a barcode scanner, a printer, sensors, and other system elements that must exchange information in manufacturing. It might seem reasonable that such oneto-one interconnection would follow a well-defined strategy and make maximum use of standards. Unfortunately, for historical reasons and because of the wide diversity of the equipment units that are available today, this situation does not hold. In fact, achieving interconnection between typical system elements can be a disconcerting experience.
RS-232-Based Networks
One of the most common approaches used to interconnect computer system elements in manufacturing is associated with a strategy that was never really intended for this purpose. As noted by Campbell (1984), In 1969, the EIA (Electronic Industries Association), Bell Laboratories, and manufacturers of communication equipment cooperatively formulated and issued EIA RS-232, which almost immediately underwent minor revisions to become RS-232-C. The RS-232 interface was developed to allow data equipment terminals to be connected to modems so that data could be transmitted over the telephone network. The entire purpose of this standard was to assure that the use of telephone lines for computer communications would be handled in a way acceptable to the telephone company. Thus, in its general application today, RS-232 is not a standard. It is more a guideline for addressing some of the issues involved in interfacing equipment. Many issues must be resolved on an individual basis, which leads to the potential for difficulties. Essentially, a vendor s statement that a computer system element is RS-232-compatible provides a starting point to consider how the equipment unit might be interconnected. However, the detailed aspects of the interconnection require further understanding of the ways in which equipment units are intended to communicate. Campbell (1984) is a helpful introduction to applying RS-232 concepts. In a sense, the history of the RS-232 interface illustrates the difficulties associated with creating a well-defined means for allowing the various elements of a computer network to interface. Past experience also indicates how difficult it is to develop standards that will apply in the future to all the difficult situations that will be encountered. As it has evolved, the RS-232 approach to the communications interface is an improvement over the total anarchy at position A in Fig. 4.11, but it still leads to a wide range of problems. An entire computer network can be configured by using combinations of point-to-point RS-232 connections. In fact, a number of
Four
A Independent action B C D E Standards/ protocols
Defined layers
Scope of interface agreement
All integration responsibility of system integrator based on vendor documentation No coordination between integrator and vendors
Requires detailed integrator understanding of vendor equipment RS-232 Ethernet TCP/IP (and Ethernet)
Function bridge strategy
Vendors and integrators conform to standards
Specified functional interface
MAP and other protocols
FIGURE 4.11
Levels of integration of computer networks.
networks of this type are in common use. Such networks require that multiple RS-232 interfaces be present on each equipment unit, as is often the case. Each particular interconnection must be customized for the two equipment units being considered. Thus, a system integrator not only must decide on the elements of the system and how they should perform in a functional sense, but also must develop a detailed understanding of the ways in which RS-232 concepts have been applied to the particular equipment units used for the network. The system integrator incurs a substantial expense in achieving the required interconnections. It is essential to realize that the RS-232 pseudo-standard only addresses the ability to transfer serially information bit by bit from one system element to another. The higher level communications protocol in Fig. 4.11 is not considered. RS-232 provides the means for running wires or fiber-optic cables from one element to another in order to allow digital signals to be conveyed between system elements. The meaning associated with these bits of information is completely dependent on the hardware and software implemented in the system elements. RS-232 is a widely used approach for computer elements to transfer information. Using RS-232 is certainly much better
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