how to generate barcode in vb.net 2010 EO Switch in Software

Encoding Code 39 Extended in Software EO Switch

4
Code 39 Full ASCII Recognizer In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Drawing Code 3/9 In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Software applications.
EO Switch
Code39 Recognizer In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Generating Code39 In Visual C#
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in .NET framework applications.
Tandem
Create Code39 In .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in ASP.NET applications.
Create Code39 In .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in .NET applications.
Tandem
Code 39 Encoder In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in VS .NET applications.
Create Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
EO Switch
Generate GS1 - 12 In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Software applications.
Generate Barcode In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Initial Address Message
Bar Code Generator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
EAN 13 Maker In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
Initial Address Message
Drawing MSI Plessey In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create MSI Plessey image in Software applications.
Data Matrix Creator In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPhone Control to generate, create ECC200 image in iPhone applications.
Initial Address Message Address Complete
Drawing Barcode In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in VS .NET applications.
GS1 DataBar Truncated Maker In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create GS1 DataBar image in Java applications.
Address Complete
Encoding EAN / UCC - 14 In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Android Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Android applications.
EAN / UCC - 14 Generation In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Font applications.
Address Complete Answer Message Answer Message
Generate Code128 In VB.NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in .NET framework applications.
Bar Code Reader In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for Java Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Java applications.
Answer Message CONVERSATION Release
Release
Release Release Complete
Release Complete Release Complete
Figure 4.2 SS7 call flow
This is important to understand because this is a big difference between SIP and SS7. A SIP INVITE is sent end to end, routed by proxies along the path. There really is no hard circuit making the connection along the way hence SIP is not really point-to-point. Also note that in SS7, each switch in the path is stateful, and is responsible for its own connection, but does not have any knowledge of the end-point state (other than what it receives from its adjacent switch). The only time any switch in the path is aware of a change in state is when it receives a message from an adjacent switch advising it that the connection is to be released. In the SS7 domain there is no registration process. A device gets connected via hardwire connections and uses signaling to notify the network when it wants to establish a connection. The phone going off-hook forms a connection path back to the end-office switch, which is the first form of signaling. The digits being dialed create a tone, which is also a form of signaling (providing the destination address). The SS7 network is part of the Intelligent Network (IN) architecture (this is also sometimes referred to as the AIN). The concept of the IN was to create a separate network that would be used for all call control. This network would consist of routing nodes, called signal transfer points (STPs) responsible for routing signaling messages through the network to the appropriate switching nodes (service switching points, or SSPs). The network would also have application servers, known as service control points (SCPs). These SCPs would then be used to store routing instructions, calling parties
Registration Procedures in a SIP Network
names and numbers for display purposes, and even number portability databases. Of course these are all in widespread use today. The problem with the IN is that every switch in the network must be configured with software to be able to access the IN elements. This proved to be quite costly as vendors quickly inflated the price of software to ensure profits. The SCP concept never really fared well outside of the U.S. because it was simply far too costly to implement. The revenues gained through a new service were quickly eroded by the cost of deployment. Another inherent issue with the IN was its inability to support other media types. The call control protocol used within the IN was of course SS7, which was originally developed for managing voice calls. Later it was adapted to support data as well, and then broadband. However there were issues in supporting video and other forms of media, especially in a switched environment. The protocol itself is capable of supporting other media types (with modifications), but the network is based on switches and therefore unable to support those media types. Not to mention that the TDM network is not well suited for multimedia. So as IP is deployed in these networks, and operators begin moving voice calls to the IP network, interworking becomes critical. The central focal point within the SS7 network is the STP. While its primary function is that of a router, it is also a firewall, a gateway, and many other things to the network. My book Signaling System #7 (McGraw-Hill, 2006) provides much greater detail as to the functions of the STP; our interest here is interworking. SS7 is well suited for the IP network. After all, SS7 is nothing more than packet data, and as long as a reliable real-time transport can be provided, SS7 can work. The problem with the IP network is its ability to support real-time applications (such as SS0), and therefore a new set of protocols had to be developed to support SS7 and other real-time functions in an IP environment. The Signaling Transport (SIGTRAN) protocol was developed for just that. Replacing the Message Transfer Part (MTP) in the SS7 network with protocols developed for IP was part of the challenge, since the MTP provides specific network management functions that have to be replicated within the IP domain. The other challenge was developing a transport protocol to replace TCP and UDP for real-time applications. The Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) was then developed to provide this function. So now that SS7 can be supported in the IP domain, operators have begun moving their SS7 facilities onto IP. This allows them to eliminate all of the TDM facilities supporting signaling and connect their STPs directly to MGCFs. The MGCF provides the connectivity between the SS7 and SIP domains. The MGCF acts as an SSP in the SS7 domain and a SIP user agent in the SIP domain. The MGCF manages all voice communications within its own domain. This means interworking with its own SS7 network. When connecting to another domain, a breakout gateway control function (BGCF) is used. The BGCF provides additional security functions for managing external networks. The use of the BGCF also simplifies routing in and out of the network. Without aggregating traffic to some border gateway, other networks would need access to all of
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.