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suggestions and recommendations and by no means an exhaustive description of all that can be done. Nor is this meant to be a very detailed, highly technical discussion on how these security mechanisms work. Always refer to the specific RFCs for the specifications.
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I put passwords first because this is the easiest and the most overlooked security measure there is. Passwords are painful for everyone, the consumer included. No one likes to have to deal with passwords every time they access their phone or every time they try to make a call. What s ironic is that while we hate passwords, we would never think of leaving the house without at least locking the door, and many of us go one step further and set an alarm. Yet isn t it funny that typing in a simple password is too much of a bother The trouble with passwords is managing the passwords so that they cannot be compromised. This means implementing password aging, which would require everyone to change their passwords periodically. Some change their passwords every month, while others change passwords every three months. There are several levels of password control within a network. Certainly the devices accessing the network should be protected themselves, but the network is the most critical asset to the operator, and every entity within the network should be protected as well. This may seem obvious, yet most network operators do not change the passwords on their voicemail platforms, their gateways, or even their routers. Instead, they deploy these entities using the factory default passwords sent by the vendor. These passwords are well documented and advertised all over the Internet, which means the hackers know your passwords as well. So the first, most rudimentary step to security in a network is to ensure that all entities within the network have their passwords changed from the factory defaults. But don t stop there, because passwords can be determined through programs developed just for this purpose. The passwords should be changed as often as can be tolerated. This then requires an entire password management initiative. Passwords should be as long as possible (the password length makes it more difficult to crack) and incorporate as many character types as possible (numbers, letters, and symbols). This extends out to the terminals that are used to access and configure the network elements. One of the best methods of password control (at least for terminal access) is the use of token IDs. A token ID is a completely randomized password that changes every 30 seconds or so. The password is based on an algorithm that only the software application (which resides on the host) and the password generator know. The password generator (my term) is really a little key fob like device with a display of numbers that change every 30 seconds or more. The numbers displayed represent the newest password, and when combined with a user s access password, they become a very difficult mechanism to hack. I strongly recommend the use of these for any terminal access, and for use on any PCs used to
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access any network element. A compromised PC that later connects to a network element could put the entire network at risk, given the nature of many of today s bots and viruses.
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Encryption solves a lot of problems. The best means of ensuring privacy while preventing message tampering is to encrypt the SIP message prior to sending it through the network. This does present some problems, though. If forwarding a SIP message that is encrypted, the various routers and proxies in the network will not be able to read the addresses contained within the various headers. Therefore the entire SIP message cannot be encrypted, unless every network element is going to be provisioned with the proper decryption keys (not a very likely scenario). The other issue is forwarding the SIP message outside of the trusted domain. Not everything can be encrypted, as this would make it impossible for the other networks to read the addresses necessary for routing. This is why there are headers that are not encrypted, while the remaining SIP message is encrypted. Encryption does require all receiving entities to have the encryption keys so that they will be able to remove the encryption (decrypt) and return the message to its original state. Without the encryption keys, the network elements cannot do anything with the message, so care must be given in deciding how to encrypt and when to encrypt. There are numerous ways to implement encryption. One approach is to encrypt only messages leaving the network. This means there are no encrypted messages internally, since all of the elements are within a trusted domain. The problem with this approach is that most attacks take place from within the network. Therefore encryption for outbound SIP messages does not solve anything. There should be encryption internally as well as externally. When a message is encrypted, some headers will remain in clear text, which means they are not encrypted. The headers that are encrypted include:
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