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6 provides tips for using shutter speed to create different effects when capturing motion.
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You can rely on today s programmed AE mechanisms to produce a properly exposed image in most situations assuming, that is, that you take the two-step approach to
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CHAPTER 2: Exploring Creative Controls
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pushing the shutter button that I described earlier. However, your idea of proper exposure may differ from the camera s choice. If you don t like the shutter speed, aperture, or combination thereof that the camera selects, switch to shutter-priority AE, aperture-priority AE, or manual exposure. You may also be able to get your camera to deliver the exposure you want by changing the EV setting, exposure metering mode, or ISO setting, as explained in the next few sections. And of course, you can always use your camera s built-in flash to add light to the scene, which will also force the exposure mechanism to vary aperture and shutter speed.
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If all else fails, you can force a change in exposure when using an autoexposure camera by tricking the exposure mechanism. To brighten the image, aim the camera at an object that s darker than your subject and press the shutter halfway down to set the exposure. Keep holding the shutter button halfway down and then reframe your subject. When you capture the image, the camera will use the exposure setting that it found appropriate for the darker scene, resulting in a brighter exposure. To produce a darker image, use the opposite approach. Remember, though, that if you re working in autofocus mode (explained later in this chapter, in the section Focus Modes ), the focus is also set when you press the shutter button halfway down. So be sure that the object you use when setting exposure is the same distance from the camera as your subject, or the focus will be off.
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Controlling Autoexposure with EV Compensation
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Even when you shoot in full programmed AE mode, you may still have some control over exposure. Most digital cameras offer an EV compensation control, which slightly increases or decreases the exposure that the autoexposure mechanism deems appropriate. EV stands for exposure value, in case you re interested. The increments of exposure shift vary from camera to camera; typically you can ramp exposure up or down in one-half or one-third steps (for example, +0.5, +1.0, +1.5). Page 17 of the color insert offers an illustration of how EV compensation affects an image.
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Choosing an Autoexposure Metering Mode
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Many advanced digital cameras also enable you to control autoexposure by changing the exposure metering mode. The metering mode determines the area within the frame that s considered when the camera analyzes the scene and sets the exposure. Standard options include the following:
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Multi-metering
Measures the light at multiple locations throughout the frame and tries to choose a setting that correctly exposes everything a task that s not always possible if the image contains very bright highlights and very dark
Shoot Like a Pro!
shadows. This mode also goes by the names matrix metering, pattern metering, and multizone metering.
Spot metering
Sets exposure according to the object that s smack dab in the center of the frame, the surrounding area be darned. Also gives preference to the center of the frame, but doesn t completely discount the perimeter.
Center-weighted metering
For routine shots, use multi-metering mode. However, if you re shooting a subject in strong backlighting, multi-metering will see all that bright light in the background and use an exposure that leaves your subject too dark, as illustrated by the first image on Page 12 of the color insert. To remedy the problem, switch to center-weighted or spot-metering. You may also need to add a flash to illuminate your subject, as was the case for the portrait featured on the color plate.
Although the monitor on your camera enables you to see whether you achieved a decent exposure, don t rely on it entirely. The brightness of the monitor can make a too-dark or too-light image appear to be properly exposed. To give yourself an exposure safety net, bracket your shots that is, take the same picture at several different exposures. When you download your pictures to your computer, you can decide which exposure works the best. When working in autoexposure mode, you can bracket shots easily by using the EV compensation control. For example, shoot one picture at EV 0.0, one at a step down from that, and one at a step up. Your camera may even have an auto-bracketing feature that shoots the series of exposures automatically with one press of the shutter button. (Don t confuse auto-bracketing with the multi-exposure mode found on some cameras, however. Auto-bracketing creates a series of individual images; multi-exposure overlays a series of shots on top of each other, as if you had composited them in a photo-editing program.)
Another factor affecting exposure, whether you work in autoexposure or manual exposure, is the ISO setting. The term ISO is a carryover from film photography. It s an international standard (from the International Standards Organization, of course) that describes a film s light sensitivity, often called film speed. The higher the film speed, the less light is required to record an image. Consumer film ranges from ISO 100 to ISO 800, with higher numbers indicating faster more sensitive film. On digital cameras, ISO indicates the capabilities of the image sensor relative to film. The default setting on most digital cameras is either 100 or 160; some cameras enable you to dial in a higher ISO.
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