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Have you ever wondered why portraits taken in the early days of photography rarely feature a smiling subject One theory a kind of disgusting one, actually is that dental hygiene wasn t yet a priority, and thus a toothy grin was not the most attractive choice. A more likely explanation, though, was that recording an image in those days required exposure times of many minutes, during which the subject had to remain absolutely still. Sometimes the sitter s head was even clamped into place to make sure it didn t move! Small wonder, then, that the most relaxed, happy-countenanced subjects appear in so-called casket photos that were taken to memorialize a person shortly after death. Today s cameras can capture a subject in fractions of a second, and most people possess presentable choppers, thanks to all those grade school lessons about the importance of brushing after meals. Even so, a smiling subject doesn t necessarily translate to a good portrait. Improper lighting, unflattering camera angles, and other creative missteps can make the most beautiful subject look terrible. And let s not forget the number-one plague of indoor and nighttime flash photography: red-eye. This chapter focuses on techniques and tools that will help you improve your people pictures, whether you re taking family photos for the living-room wall or employee head shots for your company newsletter. The first part of the chapter provides some general advice about using your digital camera for portrait work, and the remaining pages offer some specific tricks that you can use when shooting casual, formal, and outdoor portraits.
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For tips related to nighttime and action portraits, see 6.
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Shooting a digital portrait involves many of the same concerns as a film portrait good lighting, complementary clothing and backgrounds, and, of course, a reasonably cooperative subject. But working with a digital camera throws some additional issues into the mix, as the next few sections explain.
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Composing for Traditional Frame Sizes
An old rule of video photography says that you should include head room around the top and sides of the frame so that if people move during the shot, their faces don t shift out of the picture. In still photography, close framing is perfectly acceptable and can even be dramatic. But eliminating all head room when capturing digital images can lead to a problem if you later want to print and frame the picture. Digital cameras produce images that have a 4:3 aspect ratio (width relative to height), which matches that of a computer monitor or television. A 35mm film negative, on the other hand, produces images with a 3:2 aspect ratio, which is the same as for a 4 6-inch photo frame. A 5 7-inch frame has an aspect ratio of 5:7; an 8 10-inch frame, 4:5. Figure 3.1 illustrates the difference between these various aspect ratios. The light gray background rectangle represents a 4:3 digital image; the outlines represent the 4 6, 5 7, and 8 10 aspect ratios. (For the sake of clarity, everything is oriented with the long edges running horizontally.) When you enlarge a 35mm film image to a 5 7 or 8 10, the photo lab must either crop the picture or add a white border to account for the difference FIGURE 3.1 Pictures from a digital in aspect ratio between the original and the camera have a different aspect ratio than traditional enlargement. You must make the same decision photo frames. if you want to mount your digital image in any of the commercially available frame sizes (or mattes), at least until manufacturers get wise and start producing frames with a 4:3 aspect ratio. As an example, see Figure 3.2. The left image is the digital original; the middle image shows what part of the picture would remain if cropped to the 4 6-inch aspect ratio. At this aspect ratio, part of the toddler s head must be cropped away. Your other option is to reduce the original and add a border, as shown in the right image.
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