how to generate barcode in vb.net 2010 3: Taking Memorable Portraits in Software

Encoding Code128 in Software 3: Taking Memorable Portraits

CHAPTER 3: Taking Memorable Portraits
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FIGURE 3.2 If you don t leave a little head room (left), you must either crop away a portion of the subject s face (middle) or reduce the image size and add a border (right) if you want to make the picture fit a 4 6-inch photo frame.
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The moral of the story: To avoid having to lose part of your subject s face or add an unsightly border, always leave a decent margin of head room when you re shooting digital portraits. The top portrait on Page 6 of the color insert offers an example. This loose framing enables you to crop the photo as needed to fit a variety of frame sizes and aspect ratios. Of course, another way to solve the problem is to take your digital prints to a framing store and buy a custom-cut matte or frame. But you can save yourself the expense and hassle by simply getting in the habit of allowing adequate head room for all your portraits.
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Some digital cameras now offer a special 3:2 format setting in addition to the standard 4:3 format. This option limits you to capturing an area that has a 3:2 aspect ratio, a feature that s especially useful when you re shooting pictures that you know you want to frame.
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Choosing Aperture and Shutter Speed
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Portrait photography calls for a large aperture, such as f/2.8 or f/3.5, which creates a short depth of field and therefore leaves the background slightly soft in focus. A short depth of field makes the subject more visually prominent because the viewer s eye goes first to whatever is in sharpest focus. In addition, reducing the depth of field makes
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Shoot Like a Pro!
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distracting background objects less noticeable, as discussed in 2 and illustrated on Page 13 of the color insert. You can set aperture precisely if your camera offers either manual exposure or aperture-priority autoexposure (AE). Remember that as you enlarge the aperture (by shifting to a lower f-stop number), you need to increase shutter speed to account for the additional light that comes through that larger aperture. In aperture-priority AE, the camera makes the adjustment for you automatically.
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If your camera does not offer manual exposure control or aperture-priority AE, you may be able to force a larger aperture by using portrait scene mode (covered next).
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Taking Advantage of Portrait Mode
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Many digital cameras offer scene modes, which automatically select aperture, shutter speed, and other settings that are appropriate for various types of pictures. The two most common scene modes are portrait and landscape. Each camera manufacturer uses different settings for its scene modes, but portrait mode typically selects the largest available aperture to achieve the shortest possible depth of field. (See the preceding section, Choosing Aperture and Shutter Speed, for more on this topic.) Depending on the camera, portrait mode may also select a particular focal length, sharpening amount, flash setting, and exposure metering mode. You can see what settings your camera chooses in portrait mode by shooting some sample pictures and then inspecting the EXIF file data in an image viewer, as explored in 1. You then can decide whether you can rely on portrait mode or need to take more control. Remember that the settings your camera selects in any scene mode will vary depending on the amount of light; in bright sunlight, for example, the camera will likely choose a smaller aperture than it does in low light.
Using a neutral density filter over your lens reduces the amount of light entering your camera and so enables you to use a wider aperture in bright light. See 6 for more information.
Check your camera manual to see whether you can store custom capture settings as your own personal scene modes. This feature gives you the convenience of preset modes without having to give up any creative control.
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