how to generate barcode in vb.net 2010 3: Taking Memorable Portraits in Software

Maker Code 128 Code Set A in Software 3: Taking Memorable Portraits

CHAPTER 3: Taking Memorable Portraits
Recognizing USS Code 128 In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Encoding Code128 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Software applications.
Finding a Flattering Camera Angle
Scan Code-128 In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Code 128B Encoder In C#
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128A image in .NET applications.
For most portraits, you should position the camera at the subject s eye level. A high camera angle creates the impression of diminished stature, as if the viewer is towering over the subject. On the flip side, shooting from a very low angle can make subjects appear haughty because they seem to be looking down their noses at the viewer. In addition, a high or low camera angle may distort your subject s physical proportions, as illustrated by Figure 3.3, which features a selection from my personal photo box of shame. I shot this picture of my nephew from a high angle, which led to a bizarre rendering of his body shape. Just because your camera is positioned at eye level doesn t mean that you always need to have your subject looking straight into the lens, though. As illustrated by Figure 3.2 and by the left example in Figure 3.4, an upward or downward gaze can be enchanting. However, as you can FIGURE 3.3 Distortion of body proportions can occur see when you compare the left and right images in Figure 3.4, when you shoot from an a straight-ahead viewpoint creates a greater sense of extreme point of view intimacy because the subject appears to be looking the in this case, from high above the subject. viewer in the eye.
Code 128 Code Set C Creator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in ASP.NET applications.
Draw Code128 In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in .NET applications.
FIGURE 3.4 Directing your subject s eyes to a position slightly above the camera can help reduce red-eye (left); but a straight-ahead gaze creates a stronger sense of intimacy (right).
Print Code 128 Code Set C In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Barcode Creation In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
Shoot Like a Pro!
Painting Code 39 Extended In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in Software applications.
Make Barcode In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
What Causes Red-Eye
Data Matrix ECC200 Generation In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
Printing Code 128C In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Software applications.
Red-eye is caused by light from a flash reflecting off a subject s retinas, taking on the color of surrounding blood vessels. In some animal eyes, the problem may show up as a green, yellow, or white glare because of a colored membrane that s located behind the retina. Man or beast, the problem usually occurs only when the flash is positioned close to the camera lens, as it is on point-and-shoot cameras, and in low lighting, when the subject s pupils are dilated (enlarged) to absorb more light. If you have no other choice but to use a flash, you can lessen red-eye by taking advantage of the red-eye reduction flash setting found on most cameras. Before the main flash fires, the camera emits a brief preflash light to shrink the pupils a little. Another trick is to tell the subject to look slightly up or down so that reflected light from the retinas doesn t bounce back directly into the lens. Of course, moving farther from your subject also reduces red-eye because less flash light reaches the eyes.
Draw Code11 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create USD8 image in Software applications.
Draw Bar Code In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create bar code image in .NET framework applications.
Avoiding Focal Length and Distance Distortions
Make Code 128A In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 128 image in VS .NET applications.
Encode UCC.EAN - 128 In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Android applications.
Extreme camera angles aren t the only cause of subject distortion. You can also warp features if you use a wide-angle lens (short focal length) and position the camera too close to the subject, as illustrated by the left image in Figure 3.5. This image is doubly awful because I stood so close that I exceeded the camera s minimum focusing distance, leaving the subject distorted and blurry. Stepping back from my young friend fixed both problems.
Linear Generation In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Linear image in ASP.NET applications.
Recognize EAN 13 In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
FIGURE 3.5 Using a wide-angle lens and standing too close to the subject caused a blurred image and extreme smushing of facial features (left); putting more distance between subject and camera solved the problem (right).
Barcode Creator In C#
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
EAN / UCC - 13 Generator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create GTIN - 13 image in Java applications.
CHAPTER 3: Taking Memorable Portraits
Even when you can achieve proper focus, however, you may still be in the distortion zone, as shown in Figure 3.6. This time, my niece was the unlucky subject. Her face appears misshapen because I again used the wide-angle setting on my camera s zoom lens and stood only a few feet away. Even my niece s incredible blue eyes, which you can see on Page 6 of the color insert, aren t enough to make this image a winner the distortion along with the ugly background add up to a picture that s good for illustrating common photography errors, but not much else. To get a better result, shown in Figure 3.7, I convinced my niece to pose in a spot that would provide a more pleasing backdrop. (My attempts to get her to step in front of the bushes instead of climbing in the middle of them weren t successful, but when you re a proud aunt, you don t let little things like that stop you from taking pictures.) I stood about eight or nine feet away and zoomed in to the camera s maximum focal length, which is about three times that used for the previous image.
FIGURE 3.6 Even when you re within the camera s minimum focusing distance, you still may be too close to get a distortion-free image with a wide-angle lens.
FIGURE 3.7 This time, I positioned the camera farther from the subject and zoomed to a longer focal length (left). I later cropped the image to fill more of the frame with the face (right).
Shoot Like a Pro!
If you want to fill the frame with your subject s head and shoulders, use a focal length equivalent to about 135mm on a 35mm film camera and shoot at a distance of about seven feet to avoid distortion. You need to check your manual to determine how your camera s focal-length range compares to the 35mm film-camera standard. On the camera used for Figures 3.6 and 3.7, the wide-angle setting equates to a focal length of approximately that of a 35mm lens, and the maximum telephoto zoom setting is equal to about 105mm.
If your camera offers only a fixed focal length, you simply have to keep moving back from your subject until you reach the distortion-free position. Of course, when you do so, you get more background in the picture. If you shoot at a high enough image resolution, you can always crop away the excess background and enlarge the remaining image in your photo editor, as I did to create the right example in Figure 3.7 and Page 6 of the color insert.
1 explains how to compare digital camera focal lengths to focal lengths on a 35mm film camera and why the two technologies work on a different scale. See 2 for tips on image resolution.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.